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Curr Pain Headache Rep. 2018 Aug 27;22(11):71. doi: 10.1007/s11916-018-0729-x.

Is Medication Overuse Drug Specific or Not? Data from a Review of Published Literature and from an Original Study on Italian MOH Patients.

Author information

1
Division of Neuroalgology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Via Celoria 11, 20133, Milan, Italy. licia.grazzi@istituto-besta.it.
2
Neurology, Public Health and Disability Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Via Celoria 11, 20133, Milan, Italy.
3
Division of Neuroalgology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta, Via Celoria 11, 20133, Milan, Italy.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

The aim is twofold. First, to give an insight on the role exerted by different classes of drugs in favouring migraine chronification. Second, to explore the relationship between type and amount of overused medications and history of previous withdrawal treatment and of frequent relapses.

RECENT FINDINGS:

All drug classes were found to favour migraine chronification. No data are available for the association with relapses into CM-MOH. Our clinical study shows that patients who underwent previous withdrawal treatments were more likely to be overusers of multiple drug classes and overuse higher amounts of symptomatic medications, particularly, indomethacin, eletriptan and tramadol. Frequent relapsers were more likely to be overusers of opioids or ergotamine and caffeine derivates or of multiple classes, particularly acetylsalicylic acid and ergotamine/caffeine derivates. The joint results our review and clinical study do not seem to support the idea that MOH is drug-specific: rather, it points out that all drug classes may induce migraine chronification. Those drugs which are at higher risk of overuse are among those preferred by the "worst" patients, i.e. those who needed one or more withdrawal treatments for MOH. Our results reinforce the clinical impression that patients with CM and MOH, and particularly the most difficult to treat for their poor response to withdrawal treatments, are characterised by a particular drive towards the consumption of "whatever is likely to be perceived to provide some relief", despite these drugs that are perceived as "more powerful", are often indicated as second- or third-line medications.

KEYWORDS:

Anti-inflammatory drugs; Chronic migraine; Medication-overuse headache; Opioids; Triptans; Withdrawal

PMID:
30151604
DOI:
10.1007/s11916-018-0729-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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