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Nat Microbiol. 2018 Oct;3(10):1084-1089. doi: 10.1038/s41564-018-0227-2. Epub 2018 Aug 27.

The discovery of Bombali virus adds further support for bats as hosts of ebolaviruses.

Author information

1
One Health Institute & Karen C. Drayer Wildlife Health Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, USA. tgoldstein@ucdavis.edu.
2
Center for Infection and Immunity, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. sja2127@cumc.columbia.edu.
3
Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. sja2127@cumc.columbia.edu.
4
EcoHealth Alliance, New York, NY, USA. sja2127@cumc.columbia.edu.
5
Metabiota, Inc. Sierra Leone, Freetown, Sierra Leone.
6
One Health Institute & Karen C. Drayer Wildlife Health Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, USA.
7
Center for Infection and Immunity, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
8
EcoHealth Alliance, New York, NY, USA.
9
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, NY, USA.
10
Department of Systems Biology, Irving Cancer Research Center, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
11
Ministry of Health and Sanitation, Freetown, Sierra Leone.
12
Ministry of Health and Sanitation, Makeni, Sierra Leone.
13
Livestock and Veterinary Services Division, Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Food Security, Freetown, Sierra Leone.
14
Forestry and Wildlife Division, Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Food Security, Freetown, Sierra Leone.
15
Metabiota, Inc., San Francisco, CA, USA.
16
Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
17
Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.

Abstract

Here we describe the complete genome of a new ebolavirus, Bombali virus (BOMV) detected in free-tailed bats in Sierra Leone (little free-tailed (Chaerephon pumilus) and Angolan free-tailed (Mops condylurus)). The bats were found roosting inside houses, indicating the potential for human transmission. We show that the viral glycoprotein can mediate entry into human cells. However, further studies are required to investigate whether exposure has actually occurred or if BOMV is pathogenic in humans.

PMID:
30150734
DOI:
10.1038/s41564-018-0227-2

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