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Acta Biomater. 2018 Oct 1;79:239-252. doi: 10.1016/j.actbio.2018.08.031. Epub 2018 Aug 25.

Fabrication of the FGF1-functionalized sericin hydrogels with cell proliferation activity for biomedical application using genetically engineered Bombyx mori (B. mori) silk.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology, College of Biotechnology, Chongqing Engineering and Technology Research Center for Novel Silk Materials, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Sericulture, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715, PR China.
2
Institute for Clean Energy & Advanced Materials, Faculty of Materials & Energy, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715, PR China.
3
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155, USA. Electronic address: David.kaplan@tufts.edu.
4
State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology, College of Biotechnology, Chongqing Engineering and Technology Research Center for Novel Silk Materials, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Sericulture, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715, PR China. Electronic address: Xiaqy@swu.edu.cn.

Abstract

Sericin, as the major component of Bombyx mori silk, is a useful biomaterial for tissue engineering due to its hydrophilicity, biocompatibility and biodegradability. Here, we report the fabrication of a human acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF1)-functionalized sericin hydrogel using a transgenic silkworm spun silk with FGF1 incorporated in its sericin layer. Sericin, together with FGF1, were simultaneously extracted from the silk fiber and then exposed to cold-induced hydrogel formation without additional crosslinking. The fabricated FGF1 sericin hydrogels demonstrated injectability, useful mechanical properties and a porous microstructure, which contributed to cell adhesion and survival. In addition, FGF1 achieved long-term storage in the sericin hydrogels over a wide range of temperatures. Further, the sericin-FGF1 demonstrated sustained release to promote cell proliferation and wound healing. Furthermore, cellular inflammatory responses showed that the FGF1 sericin hydrogels exhibited biocompatibility and no immunogenicity. This study revealed the successful exploration of FGF1-functionalized sericin hydrogels as a new protein-based biomaterial to expand applications of FGF1 and sericin in tissue and medical engineering. Further, we demonstrated a strategy for the predesign of exogenous protein-functionalized sericin hydrogels through genetically modifying silk fibers as sources for their cost effective production at a large scale.

STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE:

Sericin from the Bombyx mori silk, is regarded as a desirable biomaterial for tissue engineering due to its hydrophilicity, biocompatibility and biodegradability. Genetically engineering the sericin with functional exogenous proteins would enhance its biofunctions and further expand its application in tissue engineering. In this study, we demonstrated a method to fabricate a human acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF1)-functionalized sericin hydrogel using a transgenic silkworm spun silk with FGF1 incorporated in its sericin layer. The fabricated FGF1 sericin hydrogels demonstrated injectability, porous microstructure, biocompatibility and no immunogenicity which contributed to cell adhesion and survival. Remarkably, FGF1 could achieve a long-term stability in the sericin hydrogels over a wide range of temperatures and sustained release to promote cell proliferation and wound healing. This study revealed the successful exploration of FGF1-functionalized sericin hydrogels as a new protein-based biomaterial in tissue and medical engineering application, and provided a strategy for the predesign of exogenous protein-functionalized sericin hydrogels through genetically modifying silk fibers as sources for their cost effective production at a large scale.

KEYWORDS:

Biomaterial; Hydrogel; Sericin; Silk; Transgenic silkworm

PMID:
30149211
DOI:
10.1016/j.actbio.2018.08.031
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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