Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Spine J. 2018 Aug 24. pii: S1529-9430(18)31099-4. doi: 10.1016/j.spinee.2018.08.011. [Epub ahead of print]

Low back pain in persons with lower extremity amputation: a systematic review of the literature.

Author information

1
Extremity Trauma & Amputation Center of Excellence (EACE), US Department of Veterans' Affairs, US Department of Defense, 13000 Bruce B. Downs Blvd., Tampa, FL, 33612, USA; School of Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Sciences, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, 3515 E. Fletcher Ave. Tampa, FL, 33612, USA; 319th Minimal Care Detachment, U.S. Army Reserves, Pinellas Park, 2801 Grand Ave. Pinellas Park, FL, USA, 33782. Electronic address: michael.highsmith@va.gov.
2
Center of Innovation on Disability & Rehabilitation Research, James A. Haley Veterans' Administration Hospital, 8900 Grand Oak Ci, Tampa, FL, 33637, USA.
3
Select Physical Therapy, Brandon, 2410 W. Brandon Blvd. Brandon, FL, 33511, USA.
4
Extremity Trauma & Amputation Center of Excellence (EACE), US Department of Veterans' Affairs, US Department of Defense, 34800 Bob Wilson Dr. San Diego, CA, 92134, USA; The Department of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Naval Medical Center San Diego, San Diego, 34800 Bob Wilson Dr. San Diego, CA, 92134, USA.
5
Extremity Trauma & Amputation Center of Excellence (EACE), US Department of Veterans' Affairs, US Department of Defense, Bethesda, 4494 North Palmer Rd, Bethesda, MD, 20889, USA; Department of Rehabilitation, Research and Development Section, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, 4494 North Palmer Rd, Bethesda, MD, 20889, USA.
6
Extremity Trauma & Amputation Center of Excellence (EACE), US Department of Veterans' Affairs, US Department of Defense, Ft. Sam Houston, 3851 Roger Brooke Dr, San Antonio, TX, 78234, USA.
7
Extremity Trauma & Amputation Center of Excellence (EACE), US Department of Veterans' Affairs, US Department of Defense, Ft. Sam Houston, 3851 Roger Brooke Dr, San Antonio, TX, 78234, USA; Center for the Intrepid, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Brooke Army Medical Center, JBSA, Ft. Sam Houston, 3851 Roger Brooke Dr, San Antonio, TX, 78234, USA.
8
Shimberg Health Sciences Library, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, 12901 Bruce B. Downs Blvd., Tampa, FL, 33612.
9
U.S. Spine & Sport Foundation, 3760 Convoy St #101. San Diego, CA, 92111, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND CONTEXT:

Lower extremity amputation (LEA) is associated with an elevated risk for development and progression of secondary health conditions. Low back pain (LBP) is one such condition adversely affecting function, independence, and quality of life.

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature to determine the strength of evidence relating the presence and severity of LBP secondary to LEA, thereby supporting the formulation of empirical evidence statements (EESs) to guide practice and future research.

STUDY DESIGN/SETTING:

Systematic review of the literature.

METHODS:

A systematic review of five databases was conducted followed by evaluation of evidence and synthesis of EESs.

RESULTS:

Seventeen manuscripts were included. From these, eight EESs were synthesized within the following categories: epidemiology, amputation level, function, disability, leg length, posture, spinal kinematics, and osseointegrated prostheses. Only the EES on epidemiology was supported by evidence at the moderate confidence level given support by eight moderate quality studies. The four EESs for amputation level, leg length, posture, and spinal kinematics were supported by evidence at the low confidence level given that each of these statements had some evidence not supporting the statement but ultimately more evidence (and of higher quality) currently supporting the statement. The remaining three EESs that addressed function, disability and osseointegrated prosthetic use were all supported by single studies or had comparable evidence that disagreed with study findings rendering insufficient evidence to support the respective EES.

CONCLUSIONS:

Based on the state of the current evidence, appropriate preventative and, particularly, treatment strategies to manage LBP in persons with LEA remain a knowledge gap and an area of future study.

KEYWORDS:

Amputee; Limb loss; Lumbago; Rehabilitation; Spinal pain; Transfemoral; Transtibial

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center