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Telemed J E Health. 2019 Aug;25(8):663-670. doi: 10.1089/tmj.2018.0116. Epub 2018 Aug 24.

Key Factors for the Success of Self-Administered Treatments of Poststroke Aphasia Using Technologies.

Author information

1
1Department of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Laval University, Québec, Canada.
2
2Cervo Brain Research Center, Québec, Canada.
3
3Research Center on Aging, Sherbrooke, Canada.
4
4School of Rehabilitation, Montreal University, Montréal, Canada.
5
5Research Center of the University Institute of Geriatrics of Montreal, Montréal, Canada.

Abstract

Background: Use of technology in language rehabilitation has grown significantly in recent years, and there is increasing evidence of its effectiveness in the treatment of poststroke aphasia. Technology has the potential to foster intensity and repetition by enabling people with aphasia to improve their skills without the constant presence of the clinician. The main objective of this article is to review and illustrate key factors for the success of self-administered treatments of poststroke aphasia using technologies. Methods: We briefly reviewed technology-based treatments of aphasia and described three determining factors for the success of self-administered treatments delivered by technology, namely, treatment-related, technology-related, and patient-related factors. Two clinical cases were also presented to illustrate issues and challenges related to the various factors to be considered before proposing such treatments. Conclusions: Self-administered treatments of poststroke aphasia using new technologies enable patients to be more independent in their rehabilitation and to benefit from more intensive and extended treatment. These benefits are important in the current economic context, where human and financial resources for clinical practice are limited. Speech-language therapists should consider these opportunities and propose new methods to deliver attractive and intensive treatments of poststroke aphasia.

KEYWORDS:

PMID:
30142032
DOI:
10.1089/tmj.2018.0116

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