Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arch Sex Behav. 2019 Jan;48(1):347-356. doi: 10.1007/s10508-018-1264-x. Epub 2018 Aug 23.

"My Sexuality…It Creates a Stress": HIV-Related Communication Among Bisexual Black and Latino Men, New York City.

Author information

1
Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Mailstop E-45, Atlanta, GA, 30329, USA. khenny@cdc.gov.
2
Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Mailstop E-45, Atlanta, GA, 30329, USA.
3
Chenega Professional and Technical Services, Chesapeake, VA, USA.
4
Community Health Program at Kingsborough Community College, City University of New York, Brooklyn, NY, USA.

Abstract

Men who have sex with men and women (including bisexual men) comprise 35% of all men who have sex with men (MSM) in the U.S. It is estimated that 121,800 men who have been bisexually active within the past year are living with HIV in the U.S. Communication about HIV may result in risk-reduction behaviors. However, little is known about the nature or context for HIV prevention communication among bisexual men, particularly for blacks and Hispanic/Latinos who are disproportionately at greater HIV risk. Therefore, we explored patterns and contexts of HIV-related communications occurring within personal social networks among bisexual black and Hispanic/Latino men. Using respondent-driven sampling methods, we conducted semi-structured interviews from 2011 to 2012 among 36 participants living in New York City. We examined interview responses from participants for main themes using computer-assisted thematic analyses. The three main themes identified were: (1) communication strategies (e.g., "You can tell a lot from how a person responds just by the tone of their voice"), (2) barriers (e.g., "My sexuality…it creates a stress"), and (3) motivations for these communications (e.g., "I know that's a(n) issue in the black community…if I could help another brother, I will do it"). Our findings can inform HIV prevention efforts such as social messaging campaigns and other risk-reduction interventions designed for bisexual men.

KEYWORDS:

Bisexual men; Black/African-American; HIV; Hispanic/Latino; Prevention communication

PMID:
30141119
DOI:
10.1007/s10508-018-1264-x

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center