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J Athl Train. 2018 Aug;53(8):738-751. doi: 10.4085/1062-6050-144-17. Epub 2018 Aug 23.

The First Decade of Web-Based Sports Injury Surveillance: Descriptive Epidemiology of Injuries in United States High School Football (2005-2006 Through 2013-2014) and National Collegiate Athletic Association Football (2004-2005 Through 2013-2014).

Author information

1
Department of Exercise and Sport Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
2
Injury Prevention Research Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
3
Graduate Athletic Training Education Program, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga.
4
Sports Medicine Assessment, Research & Testing (SMART) Laboratory, George Mason University, Manassas, VA.
5
Department of Epidemiology, University of Colorado Anschutz, Aurora.
6
Datalys Center for Sports Injury Research and Prevention, Indianapolis, IN.
7
Palo Alto Medical Foundation Research Institute, CA.
8
Department of Athletic Training, Lebanon Valley College, Annville, PA.
9
Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora.
10
Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Abstract

CONTEXT: :

The advent of Web-based sports injury surveillance via programs such as the High School Reporting Information Online system and the National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance Program has aided the acquisition of football injury data.

OBJECTIVE: :

To describe the epidemiology of injuries sustained in high school football in the 2005-2006 through 2013-2014 academic years and collegiate football in the 2004-2005 through 2013-2014 academic years using Web-based sports injury surveillance.

DESIGN: :

Descriptive epidemiology study.

SETTING: :

Online injury surveillance from football teams of high school boys (annual average = 100) and collegiate men (annual average = 43).

PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS: :

Football players who participated in practices and competitions during the 2005-2006 through 2013-2014 academic years in high school or the 2004-2005 through 2013-2014 academic years in college.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): :

Athletic trainers collected time-loss injury (≥24 hours) and exposure data. Injury rates per 1000 athlete-exposures (AEs), injury rate ratios (IRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and injury proportions by body site and diagnosis were calculated.

RESULTS: :

The High School Reporting Information Online system documented 18 189 time-loss injuries during 4 539 636 AEs; the National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance Program documented 22 766 time-loss injuries during 3 121  476 AEs. The injury rate was higher among collegiate than high school (7.29 versus 4.01/1000 AEs; IRR = 1.82; 95% CI = 1.79, 1.86) athletes. Most injuries occurred during competitions in high school (53.2%) and practices in college (60.9%). The competition injury rate was higher than the practice injury rate among both high school (IRR = 5.62; 95% CI = 5.46, 5.78) and collegiate (IRR = 6.59; 95% CI = 6.41, 6.76) players. Most injuries at both levels affected the lower extremity and the shoulder/clavicle and were diagnosed as ligament sprains and muscle/tendon strains. However, concussion was a common injury during competitions among most positions.

CONCLUSIONS: :

Injury rates were higher in college than in high school and higher for competitions than for practices. Concussion was a frequent injury sustained during competitions, which confirms the need to develop interventions to mitigate its incidence and severity.

KEYWORDS:

concussion; lower extremity injuries; musculoskeletal injuries

PMID:
30138047
PMCID:
PMC6188086
[Available on 2019-08-01]
DOI:
10.4085/1062-6050-144-17

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