Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 Aug 22;15(9). pii: E1809. doi: 10.3390/ijerph15091809.

Prevalence and Risk Factors of Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and Cryptosporidium Infections in Elementary School Children in Southwestern China: A School-Based Cross-Sectional Study.

Yang D1,2,3, Yang Y4,5,6, Wang Y7,8,9, Yang Y10,11,12, Dong S13,14,15, Chen Y16, Jiang Q17,18,19, Zhou Y20,21,22.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Fudan University, 138 Yi Xue Yuan Road, Shanghai 200032, China. 17211020111@fudan.edu.cn.
2
Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety, Fudan University, Ministry of Education, Shanghai 200032, China. 17211020111@fudan.edu.cn.
3
Center for Tropical Disease Research, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China. 17211020111@fudan.edu.cn.
4
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Fudan University, 138 Yi Xue Yuan Road, Shanghai 200032, China. yayang16@fudan.edu.cn.
5
Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety, Fudan University, Ministry of Education, Shanghai 200032, China. yayang16@fudan.edu.cn.
6
Center for Tropical Disease Research, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China. yayang16@fudan.edu.cn.
7
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Fudan University, 138 Yi Xue Yuan Road, Shanghai 200032, China. 17211020008@fudan.edu.cn.
8
Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety, Fudan University, Ministry of Education, Shanghai 200032, China. 17211020008@fudan.edu.cn.
9
Center for Tropical Disease Research, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China. 17211020008@fudan.edu.cn.
10
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Fudan University, 138 Yi Xue Yuan Road, Shanghai 200032, China. 16211020071@fudan.edu.cn.
11
Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety, Fudan University, Ministry of Education, Shanghai 200032, China. 16211020071@fudan.edu.cn.
12
Center for Tropical Disease Research, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China. 16211020071@fudan.edu.cn.
13
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Fudan University, 138 Yi Xue Yuan Road, Shanghai 200032, China. 17211020051@fudan.edu.cn.
14
Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety, Fudan University, Ministry of Education, Shanghai 200032, China. 17211020051@fudan.edu.cn.
15
Center for Tropical Disease Research, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China. 17211020051@fudan.edu.cn.
16
School of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1G 5Z3, Canada. Yue.Chen@uottawa.ca.
17
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Fudan University, 138 Yi Xue Yuan Road, Shanghai 200032, China. jiangqw@fudan.edu.cn.
18
Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety, Fudan University, Ministry of Education, Shanghai 200032, China. jiangqw@fudan.edu.cn.
19
Center for Tropical Disease Research, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China. jiangqw@fudan.edu.cn.
20
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Fudan University, 138 Yi Xue Yuan Road, Shanghai 200032, China. z_yibiao@hotmail.com.
21
Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety, Fudan University, Ministry of Education, Shanghai 200032, China. z_yibiao@hotmail.com.
22
Center for Tropical Disease Research, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China. z_yibiao@hotmail.com.

Abstract

Background: Intestinal parasitic infections pose great public health challenges in school children in developing countries. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of A. lumbricoides, T. trichiura and Cryptosporidium among elementary school children in rural southwestern China. Methods: A school-based cross-sectional study involving 321 elementary school children was conducted in 2014 in the southwest of China. They were invited to provide a stool sample and interviewed about the sanitary situation and hygiene behavior. Stool specimens were examined for A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura using the Kato-Katz fecal thick-smear technique. The presence of Cryptosporidium was determined using a modified acid-fast staining method. Results: The prevalence of infection was 10.0% (95% CI: 6.9⁻13.8%) for A. lumbricoides, 25.2% (95% CI: 20.6⁻30.4%) for T. trichiura and 2.4% for (95% CI: 1.1⁻4.9%) Cryptosporidium. The prevalence of co-infection was 3.7% (95% CI: 1.9⁻6.4%) for A. lumbricoides/T. trichiura, 0.3% (95% CI: 0⁻1.7%) for A. lumbricoides/Cryptosporidium and 0.9% (95% CI: 0.2⁻2.7%) for T. trichiura/Cryptosporidium. Children from households using well or river water were associated with a greater odds of A. lumbricoides infection (aOR = 2.61, 95% CI: 1.12⁻6.05). Having a household lavatory was associated with a lower odds of T. trichiura infection (aOR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.30⁻0.84). Children who had three meals at the school canteen on week days were at a lower risk of Cryptosporidium infection. The use of spring water as a water source was associated with lower odds of any intestinal infection (aOR = 0.56, 95% CI: 0.35⁻0.91). Conclusions: Our study calls for an intervention program of school-based deworming combined with health education, hygiene promotion and provision of safe water and improved sanitation.

KEYWORDS:

A. lumbricoides; China; Cryptosporidium; T. trichiura; school children

PMID:
30135364
PMCID:
PMC6165538
DOI:
10.3390/ijerph15091809
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center