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J Immunol. 2018 Oct 1;201(7):1837-1841. doi: 10.4049/jimmunol.1701738. Epub 2018 Aug 22.

Cutting Edge: Elevated Leptin during Diet-Induced Obesity Reduces the Efficacy of Tumor Immunotherapy.

Author information

1
Department of Urology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455.
2
Microbiology, Immunology, and Cancer Biology Graduate Program, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455.
3
Department of Pharmaceutics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455.
4
Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Department of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461.
5
Department of Medical Microbiology, Immunology, and Cell Biology, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, IL 62702.
6
Simmons Cancer Institute, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, IL 62702.
7
Department of Urology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455; tgriffit@umn.edu.
8
Center for Immunology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455; and.
9
Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455.

Abstract

Various malignancies are reproducibly cured in mouse models, but most cancer immunotherapies show objective responses in a fraction of treated patients. One reason for this disconnect may be the use of young, lean mice lacking immune-altering comorbidities present in cancer patients. Although many cancer patients are overweight or obese, the effect of obesity on antitumor immunity is understudied in preclinical tumor models. We examined the effect of obesity on two immunotherapeutic models: systemic anti-CTLA-4 mAb and intratumoral delivery of a TRAIL-encoding adenovirus plus CpG. Both therapies were effective in lean mice, but neither provided a survival benefit to diet-induced obese BALB/c mice. Interestingly, tumor-bearing leptin-deficient (ob/ob) obese BALB/c mice did respond to treatment. Moreover, reducing systemic leptin with soluble leptin receptor:Fc restored the antitumor response in diet-induced obese mice. These data demonstrate the potential of targeting leptin to improve tumor immunotherapy when immune-modulating comorbidities are present.

PMID:
30135180
PMCID:
PMC6143418
[Available on 2019-10-01]
DOI:
10.4049/jimmunol.1701738

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