Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2018 Nov;12(6):1101-1107. doi: 10.1177/1932296818793756. Epub 2018 Aug 22.

From Wary Wearers to d-Embracers: Personas of Readiness to Use Diabetes Devices.

Author information

1
1 Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USA.
2
2 Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Diabetes devices such as insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) are associated with improved health and quality of life in adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, uptake remains low. The aim of this study was to develop different "personas" of adults with T1D in relation to readiness to adopt new diabetes technology.

METHODS:

Participants were 1498 T1D Exchange participants who completed surveys on barriers to uptake, technology attitudes, and other psychosocial variables. HbA1c data was available from the T1D Exchange for 30% of the sample. K-means cluster analyses grouped the sample by device barriers and attitudes. The authors assigned descriptive labels based on cluster characteristics. ANOVAs and chi-square tests assessed group differences by demographic and psychosocial variables (eg, diabetes duration, diabetes distress).

RESULTS:

Analyses yielded five distinct personas. The d-Embracers (54% of participants) endorsed few barriers to device use and had the highest rates of device use, lowest HbA1c, and were the least distressed. The Free Rangers (23%) had the most negative technology attitudes. The Data Minimalists (10%) used pumps but had lower CGM use and did not want more diabetes information. The Wary Wearers (11%) had lower overall device use, were younger, more distressed, endorsed many barriers, and had higher HbA1c. The High Distress (3%) group members were the youngest, had the shortest diabetes duration, reported the most barriers, and were the most distressed.

CONCLUSION:

These clinically meaningful personas of device readiness can inform tailored interventions targeting barriers and psychosocial needs to increase device uptake.

KEYWORDS:

continuous glucose monitoring; device uptake; technology attitudes; type 1 diabetes

PMID:
30132692
PMCID:
PMC6232751
DOI:
10.1177/1932296818793756
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center