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Am J Perinatol. 2019 Mar;36(4):399-405. doi: 10.1055/s-0038-1668591. Epub 2018 Aug 21.

Induction of Labor versus Scheduled Cesarean in Morbidly Obese Women: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

Author information

1
Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
2
Division of Maternal and Fetal Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina.
3
Division of Clinical and Epidemiologic Research, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina.
4
Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

 To assess the costs, complication rates, and harm-benefit tradeoffs of induction of labor (IOL) compared to scheduled cesarean delivery (CD) in women with class III obesity.

STUDY DESIGN:

 We conducted a cost analysis of IOL versus scheduled CD in nulliparous morbidly obese women. Primary outcomes were surgical site infection (SSI), chorioamnionitis, venous thromboembolism, blood transfusion, and readmission. Model outcomes were mean cost of each strategy, cost per complication avoided, and complication tradeoffs. We assessed the costs, complication rates, and harm-benefit tradeoffs of IOL compared with scheduled CD in women with class III obesity.

RESULTS:

 A total of 110 patients underwent scheduled CD and 114 underwent IOL, of whom 61 (54%) delivered via cesarean. The group delivering vaginally experienced fewer complications. SSI occurred in 0% in the vaginal delivery group, 13% following scheduled cesarean, and 16% following induction then cesarean. In the decision model, the mean cost of induction was $13,349 compared with $14,575 for scheduled CD. Scheduled CD costs $9,699 per case of chorioamnionitis avoided, resulted in 18 cases of chorioamnionitis avoided per additional SSI and 3 cases of chorioamnionitis avoided per additional hospital readmission. In sensitivity analysis, IOL is cost saving compared with scheduled CD unless the cesarean rate following induction exceeds 70%.

CONCLUSION:

 In morbidly obese women, induction of labor remains cost-saving until the rate of cesarean following induction exceeds 70%.

PMID:
30130822
DOI:
10.1055/s-0038-1668591

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