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J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2018 Aug;27(8):965-973. doi: 10.1089/jwh.2018.7274.

Sex and Gender Differences in Migraine-Evaluating Knowledge Gaps.

Author information

1
1 Society for Women's Health Research , Washington, District of Columbia.
2
2 Nashville Neuroscience Group , Nashville, Tennessee.
3
3 Department of Neurology, Vanderbilt University , Nashville, Tennessee.
4
4 Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine , Bronx, New York.
5
5 Carolina Headache Institute , Durham, North Carolina.
6
6 Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital , Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
7
7 Golden Graine , Los Angeles, California.
8
8 Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic , Phoenix, Arizona.
9
9 Department of Sociology, Rutgers University , New Brunswick, New Jersey.
10
10 Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital , Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
11
11 Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging , Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts.
12
12 Department of Nursing, Marymount University, Arlington, Virginia.
13
13 Department of Neurological Sciences, University of Vermont , Burlington, Vermont.
14
14 Department of Neurology, Thomas Jefferson University , Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Abstract

Migraine is a common chronic neurological disease that disproportionately affects women. Migraine has significant negative effects on physical, emotional, and social aspects of health, and can be costly for patients, employers, and society as a whole. Growing evidence supports the roles of sex and gender in migraine risk, pathophysiology, presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and management. However, sex and gender differences in migraine have received limited attention, which can impede advancements in migraine detection, treatment, care, and education. The Society for Women's Health Research convened an interdisciplinary expert panel of researchers, clinicians, and advocates for a roundtable meeting to review the current research on sex and gender differences in migraine. This review summarizes discussions from the roundtable and prioritizes areas of need that warrant further attention in migraine research, care, and education. Examining sex and gender differences in migraine and addressing knowledge gaps will decrease the health and economic burden of migraine for both women and men.

KEYWORDS:

gender; headache; migraine; pain; sex

PMID:
30129895
DOI:
10.1089/jwh.2018.7274
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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