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J Natl Med Assoc. 2018 Apr 7. pii: S0027-9684(17)30170-0. doi: 10.1016/j.jnma.2018.03.004. [Epub ahead of print]

Implementation of the NCAA Sickle Cell Trait Screening Policy: A Survey of Athletic Staff and Student-athletes.

Author information

1
College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Institute of Public Health, Florida A&M University, 1515 S Martin Luther King Jr Blvd, FSH Science Research Center Room 209E, Tallahassee, FL 32307, USA. Electronic address: charlotte.baker@famu.edu.
2
Center on Genomics, Race, Identity, Difference (GRID), Social Science Research Institute, Duke University, Box 90420 Durham, NC 27708-0420, USA.
3
Emory University Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry, Graduate Institute of Liberal Arts (ILA), Emory University, 1635 N. Decatur Road Atlanta 30322, Georgia.
4
Center on Genomics, Race, Identity, Difference (GRID), Social Science Research Institute, Duke University, Box 90420 Durham, NC 27708-0420, USA; Department of African and African American Studies, Duke University, 234 Ernestine Friedl Building, Box 90252, Durham, NC 27708, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe the perspectives and experiences of athletic trainers, coaches, and student-athletes approximately three years post-implementation of the NCAA sickle cell trait (SCT) screening policy.

PARTICIPANTS:

Two-hundred and eight student-athletes, 32 athletic trainers, and 43 coaches from 10 NCAA Division I (DI) institutions in North Carolina from January to June 2014.

METHODS:

Two online surveys were used to assess knowledge, perspectives, and experiences.

RESULTS:

Athletic staff were more supportive than student-athletes of the need for the policy. Noted challenges included variation in implementation and follow-up for SCT-positive athletes, financial costs to institutions and athletes, and timing of the screening.

CONCLUSIONS:

More education about SCT is needed for student-athletes and athletic staff in order to help make the implementation more successful. All parties need to be in agreement regarding the importance of knowing which student-athletes have SCT and how that information will be utilized.

KEYWORDS:

Athletics; Clinical medicine; Genetic counseling; Health education; Pre-participation examination; Sickle cell trait; Sports medicine

PMID:
30129496
DOI:
10.1016/j.jnma.2018.03.004

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