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Nat Nanotechnol. 2018 Nov;13(11):1057-1065. doi: 10.1038/s41565-018-0244-6. Epub 2018 Aug 20.

An integrated self-healable electronic skin system fabricated via dynamic reconstruction of a nanostructured conducting network.

Author information

1
Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
2
Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, South Korea.
3
Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
4
Department of Chemical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, South Korea.
5
Corporate Research and Development, Performance Materials Technology Center, Asahi Kasei Corporation, Shizuoka, Japan.
6
Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
7
Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
8
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
9
Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea.
10
Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. zbao@stanford.edu.

Abstract

Electronic skin devices capable of monitoring physiological signals and displaying feedback information through closed-loop communication between the user and electronics are being considered for next-generation wearables and the 'Internet of Things'. Such devices need to be ultrathin to achieve seamless and conformal contact with the human body, to accommodate strains from repeated movement and to be comfortable to wear. Recently, self-healing chemistry has driven important advances in deformable and reconfigurable electronics, particularly with self-healable electrodes as the key enabler. Unlike polymer substrates with self-healable dynamic nature, the disrupted conducting network is unable to recover its stretchability after damage. Here, we report the observation of self-reconstruction of conducting nanostructures when in contact with a dynamically crosslinked polymer network. This, combined with the self-bonding property of self-healing polymer, allowed subsequent heterogeneous multi-component device integration of interconnects, sensors and light-emitting devices into a single multi-functional system. This first autonomous self-healable and stretchable multi-component electronic skin paves the way for future robust electronics.

PMID:
30127474
DOI:
10.1038/s41565-018-0244-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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