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Prosthet Orthot Int. 2018 Aug 18:309364618792746. doi: 10.1177/0309364618792746. [Epub ahead of print]

The relationship between lumbar lordosis angle and low back pain in individuals with transfemoral amputation.

Author information

1
1 VA Puget Sound Healthcare System, Seattle, WA, USA.
2
2 Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
3
3 VA RR&D Center for Limb Loss and Mobility, Seattle, WA, USA.
4
4 Ohio Rehab Center II, North Canton, Ohio, USA.
5
5 Motion and Sports Performance Laboratory, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Stanford, Palo Alto, CA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Low back pain is a common secondary disabling condition in the transfemoral amputee population. Transfemoral amputees are at risk of excessive lumbar lordosis; it has been suggested that increased lumbar lordosis may be associated with low back pain. However, the relationship between lumbar lordosis angle and low back pain has not yet been studied in this population.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether the extent of lumbar lordosis is associated with low back pain in transfemoral amputees.

STUDY DESIGN:

Case-control observational study.

METHODS:

Participants included eight transfemoral amputees without low back pain and nine transfemoral amputees with low back pain. Etiology of amputation was primarily trauma. All participants underwent lateral view radiographs of the lumbar spine, from which lumbar lordosis angle and sacral inclination angle were measured.

RESULTS:

Lumbar lordosis angle mean ± standard deviation was 46.1° ± 12.4° in participants with low back pain and 51.0° ± 12.6° in those without. Sacral inclination angle mean ± standard deviation was 38.3° ± 8.7° in participants with low back pain and 39.1° ± 7.5° in those without. There was no significant difference in lumbar lordosis angle or sacral inclination angle between participants with and without low back pain.

CONCLUSION:

This study suggests that increased lumbar lordosis angle and sacral inclination angle are not significantly associated with low back pain in transfemoral amputees of a primarily traumatic etiology. Clinical relevance Low back pain (LBP) is a common, disabling condition in transfemoral amputees. In the clinical setting, increased lumbar lordosis is implicated in LBP. This study does not support an association between increased lumbar lordosis and LBP; further study is needed to understand the increased prevalence of LBP in this population.

KEYWORDS:

Low back pain; pain research; prosthetics; rehabilitation; rehabilitation of amputees; rehabilitation of prostheses users; secondary disabling condition; transfemoral amputation

PMID:
30122108
DOI:
10.1177/0309364618792746

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