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Gene. 2018 Dec 30;679:133-137. doi: 10.1016/j.gene.2018.08.059. Epub 2018 Aug 17.

Association between SERT insertion/deletion polymorphism and the risk of irritable bowel syndrome: A meta-analysis based on 7039 subjects.

Author information

1
Department of General Surgery, People's Hospital of Dongxihu District, Wuhan 430040, China.
2
Department of General Surgery, The Fifth Hospital of Wu Han, Wuhan 430050, China.
3
Department of General Surgery, People's Hospital of Dongxihu District, Wuhan 430040, China. Electronic address: zhouwenhu1969@163.com.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

We performed this study to better assess the relationship between serotonin transporter (SERT) insertion/deletion polymorphism and the risk of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

METHODS:

Eligible studies were searched in PubMed, Medline, Embase and CNKI. A total of 27 studies with 7039 participants were analyzed.

RESULTS:

Significant association with the risk of IBS was detected for the SERT insertion/deletion polymorphism in additive comparison (p < 0.0001). Further subgroup analyses according to ethnicity of participants revealed that the SERT insertion/deletion polymorphism was significantly associated with the risk of IBS in Asians (dominant model: p = 0.001; recessive model: p = 0.0003; allele model: p = 0.001) and Caucasians (dominant model: p = 0.04; additive model: p < 0.0001). When we stratified available data according to type of disease, we found that the SERT insertion/deletion polymorphism was significantly correlated with the risk of constipation predominant IBS (IBS-C) in recessive comparison (p = 0.04). However, no positive results were detected in the diarrhea predominant IBS (IBS-D) and mixture of diarrhea and constipation IBS (IBS-M) subgroups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings indicated that the SERT insertion/deletion polymorphism may serve as a genetic biomarker of IBS in Asians and Caucasians.

KEYWORDS:

Gene polymorphism; Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); Meta-analysis; Serotonin transporter (SERT)

PMID:
30121382
DOI:
10.1016/j.gene.2018.08.059
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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