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J Safety Res. 2018 Sep;66:71-79. doi: 10.1016/j.jsr.2018.06.005. Epub 2018 Jun 14.

Design and implementation of a parent guide for coaching teen drivers.

Author information

1
School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, St Lucia Campus, St Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia; University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, University of Michigan, 2901 Baxter Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2150, USA; University of Michigan Injury Prevention Center, University of Michigan, 2800 Plymouth Road, NCRC 10-G080, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. Electronic address: l.buckley@uq.edu.au.
2
University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, University of Michigan, 2901 Baxter Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2150, USA; University of Michigan Injury Prevention Center, University of Michigan, 2800 Plymouth Road, NCRC 10-G080, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
3
University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, University of Michigan, 2901 Baxter Road, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2150, USA.
4
University of Michigan Injury Prevention Center, University of Michigan, 2800 Plymouth Road, NCRC 10-G080, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Teens beginning to drive independently are at significant increased risk of motor-vehicle crashes relative to their other life stages. There is, however, little guidance for parents as to how best to supervise learning to drive.

METHOD:

This study sought to undertake an informed approach to development and implementation of a Parent Guide. We included a multi-stage development process, using theory, findings from a Delphi-study of young driver traffic-safety experts, and parent focus groups. This process informed the development of a Guide that was then evaluated for feasibility and acceptability, comparing a group that received the Guide with a control group of parent and teen dyads. Both members of the dyads were surveyed at baseline, again at the approximate time teens would be licensed to drive independently (post-test), and again three months later.

RESULTS:

We found no difference in the proportion of teens who became licensed between those given the new Guide and control teens (who received the state-developed booklet); that is the Guide did not appear to promote or delay licensure. Teens in the Guide group reported that their parents were more likely to use the provided resource compared with control teens. Responses indicated that the Parent Guide was favorably viewed, that it was easy to use, and that the logging of hours was a useful inclusion. Parents noted that the Guide helped them manage their stress, provided strategies to keep calm, and helped with planning practice. In contrast, control parents noted that their booklet helped explain rules. Among licensed teens there was no significant difference in self-reported risky driving at the three-month follow-up. We discuss the challenges in providing motivation for parents to move beyond a set number of practice hours to provide diversity of driving practice.

KEYWORDS:

Evaluation; Intervention program; Learner driver; Motor vehicle; Supervision

PMID:
30121112
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsr.2018.06.005

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