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Dent Traumatol. 2018 Dec;34(6):401-405. doi: 10.1111/edt.12433. Epub 2018 Oct 16.

Frequency of crown and root dilaceration of permanent incisors after dental trauma to their predecessor teeth.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive and Community Dentistry, Dental School, Rio de Janeiro State University, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
2
Department of Specific formation, Paediatric Dentistry, Dental School, Fluminense Federal University, Nova Friburgo, Brazil.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS:

Dental trauma to the predecessor teeth can cause crown and root dilacerations to the successor teeth, which can interfere with the normal development of permanent teeth. The aims of this study were to verify the types of trauma more frequent to the predecessor teeth that cause dilaceration to their successor teeth, to determine the frequency of crown and root dilacerations in permanent incisors, taking into account the child's age at the time of trauma, and to describe the types of treatment performed.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Details of 815 anterior primary teeth with dental injury were obtained from 483 dental records of children aged 0-9 years at the time of trauma.

RESULTS:

Of 815 traumatized primary teeth, 161 successor teeth were clinically and radiographically reviewed until complete eruption and had some type of sequel. Avulsion and intrusive luxation were the most frequent types of trauma to the predecessor teeth that caused dilaceration to their successor teeth. Enamel discoloration (30.4%), hypoplasia (23.6%), root (14.3%) and crown (9.9%) dilacerations were the most common sequelae observed in the successor teeth. Root and crown dilacerations were more frequent in children aged more than and up to 3 years, respectively. Tooth extraction and orthodontic treatment were the most common treatments.

CONCLUSIONS:

Dentists must be aware of the relationship between the child's age at the time of trauma to the predecessor tooth and the type of sequel to the successor tooth in order to diagnose, monitor, and treat the sequel properly.

KEYWORDS:

deciduous; dentition; permanent; teeth; tooth injuries

PMID:
30117639
DOI:
10.1111/edt.12433
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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