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MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2018 Aug 17;67(32):877-881. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm6732a2.

Corneal Infections Associated with Sleeping in Contact Lenses - Six Cases, United States, 2016-2018.

Abstract

Contact lenses, when worn and cared for properly, are a safe and effective form of vision correction used by an estimated 45 million Americans. However, contact lens wearers are at risk for contact lens-related eye infections, especially when wearers do not practice proper contact lens wear and care habits. These infections, affecting the cornea and known as microbial keratitis (Figure), can lead to serious adverse health outcomes. Because contact lenses are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as medical devices, contact lens-related corneal infections should be reported to FDA as an adverse event. To illustrate their serious health implications, six cases of contact lens-related corneal infection, in which sleeping in lenses was reported as the main risk factor, are presented. Consequences of infection reported among the identified cases included the need for frequent administration of antibiotic eye drops, multiple follow-up medical appointments, and permanent eye damage. Health education measures directed toward contact lens wearers should emphasize raising awareness of the risks of sleeping in contact lenses as well as adherence to all recommendations for the wear and care of contact lenses. Additional measures are needed to educate eye care professionals about the need to report contact lens-related corneal infections to MedWatch, the FDA Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting program (https://www.fda.gov/MedWatch/).

PMID:
30114003
PMCID:
PMC6095652
DOI:
10.15585/mmwr.mm6732a2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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