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BMC Psychiatry. 2018 Aug 15;18(1):256. doi: 10.1186/s12888-018-1836-2.

A systematic review of co-responder models of police mental health 'street' triage.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, OX3 7JX, UK. Stephen.puntis@psych.ox.ac.uk.
2
Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, OX3 7JX, UK.
3
MD Program, University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine, Toronto, ON, M5S 1A8, Canada.
4
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, OX3 7JX, UK.
5
Coventry and Warwickshire Partnership NHS Trust, Wayside House, Wilsons Lane Coventry, Warwickshire, CV6 6NY, UK.
6
Bodleian Health Care Libraries, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Police mental health street triage is an increasingly common intervention when dealing with police incidents in which there is a suspected mental health component. We conducted a systematic review of street triage interventions with three aims. First, to identify papers reporting on models of co-response police mental health street triage. Second, to identify the characteristics of service users who come in to contact with these triage services. Third, to evaluate the effectiveness of co-response triage services.

METHODS:

We conducted a systematic review. We searched the following databases: Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, EBSCO CINAHL, Scopus, Thompson Reuters Web of Science Core Collection, The Cochrane Library, ProQuest National Criminal Justice Reference Service Abstracts, ProQuest Dissertations & Theses, EThoS, and OpenGrey. We searched reference and citation lists. We also searched for other grey literature through Google, screening the first 100 PDFs of each of our search terms. We performed a narrative synthesis of our results.

RESULTS:

Our search identified 11,553 studies. After screening, 26 were eligible. Over two-thirds (69%) had been published within the last 3 years. We did not identify any randomised control trials. Results indicated that street triage might reduce the number of people taken to a place of safety under S136 of the Mental Health Act where that power exists, or reduce the use of police custody in other jurisdictions.

CONCLUSIONS:

There remains a lack of evidence to evaluate the effectiveness of street triage and the characteristics, experience, and outcomes of service users. There is also wide variation in the implementation of the co-response model, with differences in hours of operation, staffing, and incident response.

KEYWORDS:

Crisis team; Mental health crisis; Police and mental health; Street triage

PMID:
30111302
PMCID:
PMC6094921
DOI:
10.1186/s12888-018-1836-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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