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Behav Brain Res. 2019 Jan 1;356:46-50. doi: 10.1016/j.bbr.2018.08.004. Epub 2018 Aug 11.

Social behavioral phenotyping of the zebrafish casper mutant following embryonic alcohol exposure.

Author information

1
University of Texas at Austin, 2401 Speedway, Patterson Hall Room 522, Austin, TX 78712, United States of America. Electronic address: ymf@utexas.edu.
2
University of Texas at Austin, 2401 Speedway, Patterson Hall Room 522, Austin, TX 78712, United States of America. Electronic address: ashtileah@gmail.com.
3
University of Texas at Austin, 2401 Speedway, Patterson Hall Room 522, Austin, TX 78712, United States of America. Electronic address: eberhart@austin.utexas.edu.

Abstract

The term Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) describes all the deleterious consequences of prenatal alcohol exposure. Impaired social behavior is a common symptom of FASD. The zebrafish has emerged as a powerful model organism with which to examine the effects of embryonic alcohol exposure on social behavior due to an innate strong behavior, called shoaling. The relative transparency of the embryo also makes zebrafish powerful for cellular analyses, such as characterizing neural circuitry. However, as zebrafish develop, pigmentation begins to obscure the brain and other tissues. Due to mutations disrupting pigmentation, the casper zebrafish strain remains relatively transparent throughout adulthood, potentially permitting researchers to image neural circuits in vivo, via epifluorescence, confocal and light sheet microscopy. Currently, however the behavioral profile of casper zebrafish post embryonic alcohol exposure has not been completed. We report that exposure to 1% alcohol from either 6 to 24, or 24 to 26 h postfertilization reduces the social behavior of adult casper zebrafish. Our findings set the stage for the use of this important zebrafish resource in studies of FASD.

KEYWORDS:

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder; Social behavior; Zebrafish

PMID:
30107225
PMCID:
PMC6476196
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbr.2018.08.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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