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Ann Intensive Care. 2018 Aug 13;8(1):83. doi: 10.1186/s13613-018-0428-0.

Video laryngoscopy versus direct laryngoscopy for first-attempt tracheal intubation in the general ward.

Author information

1
Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Asan Medical Centre, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 88 Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 05505, Republic of Korea.
2
Medical Emergency Team, Asan Medical Centre, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Asan Medical Centre, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 88 Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 05505, Republic of Korea. sbhong@amc.seoul.kr.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Recent trials showed that video laryngoscopy (VL) did not yield higher first-attempt tracheal intubation success rate than direct laryngoscopy (DL) and was associated with higher rates of complications. Tracheal intubation can be more challenging in the general ward than in the intensive care unit. This study aimed to investigate which laryngoscopy mode is associated with higher first-attempt intubation success in a general ward.

METHODS:

This is a retrospective study of tracheal intubations conducted at a tertiary academic hospital. This analysis included all intubations performed by the medical emergency team in the general ward during a 48-month period.

RESULTS:

For the 958 included patients, the initial laryngoscopy mode was video laryngoscopy in 493 (52%) and direct laryngoscopy in 465 patients (48%). The overall first-attempt success rate was 69% (664 patients). The first-attempt success rate was higher with VL (79%; 391/493) than with DL (59%; 273/465, p < 0.001). The first-attempt intubation success rate was higher among experienced operators (83%; 266/319) than among inexperienced operators (62%; 398/639, p < 0.001). In multivariate logistic regression analyses, VL, pre-intubation heart rate, pre-intubation SpO2 > 80%, a non-predicted difficult airway, experienced operator, and Cormack-Lehane grade were associated with first-attempt intubation success in the general ward. Over all intubation-related complications were not different between two groups (27% for VL vs. 25% for DL). However, incidence of a post-intubation SpO2 < 80% was higher with VL than with DL (4% vs. 1%, p = 0.005), and in-hospital mortality was also higher (53.8% vs. 43%, p = 0.001).

CONCLUSION:

In a general ward setting, the first-attempt intubation success rate was higher with video laryngoscopy than with direct laryngoscopy. However, video laryngoscopy did not reduce intubation-related complications. Furthers trials on best way to perform intubation in the emergency settings are required.

KEYWORDS:

Critical illness; Intubation; Laryngoscopy

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