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Mol Psychiatry. 2019 Jan;24(1):34-48. doi: 10.1038/s41380-018-0197-z. Epub 2018 Aug 13.

The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS): progress toward understanding suicide among soldiers.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA.
2
Department of Psychiatry and Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.
3
VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, CA, USA.
4
Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA. robert.ursano@usuhs.edu.

Abstract

Responding to an unprecedented increase in the suicide rate among soldiers, in 2008 the US Army and US National Institute of Mental Health funded the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS), a multicomponent epidemiological and neurobiological study of risk and resilience factors for suicidal thoughts and behaviors, and their psychopathological correlates among Army personnel. Using a combination of administrative records, representative surveys, computerized neurocognitive tests, and blood samples, Army STARRS and its longitudinal follow-up study (STARRS-LS) are designed to identify potentially actionable findings to inform the Army's suicide prevention efforts. The current report presents a broad overview of Army STARRS and its findings to date on suicide deaths, attempts, and ideation, as well as other important outcomes that may increase suicide risk (e.g., mental disorders, sexual assault victimization). The findings highlight the complexity of environmental and genetic risk and protective factors in different settings and contexts, and the importance of life and career history in understanding suicidal thoughts and behaviors.

PMID:
30104726
DOI:
10.1038/s41380-018-0197-z

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