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BMC Res Notes. 2018 Aug 13;11(1):583. doi: 10.1186/s13104-018-3685-y.

A pilot study on the importance of forefoot bone length in male 400-m sprinters: is there a key morphological factor for superior long sprint performance?

Author information

1
Faculty of Sport and Health Science, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Nojihigashi, Kusatsu, Shiga, 525-8577, Japan.
2
Faculty of Sport and Health Science, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Nojihigashi, Kusatsu, Shiga, 525-8577, Japan. t-suga@fc.ritsumei.ac.jp.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The main purpose of the present study was to determine the relationship between the forefoot bone length and long sprint performance in well-trained 400-m specialized sprinters. The total lengths of the forefoot bones of the big and second toes in 25 male 400-m sprinters and 25 male non-sprinters were measured using magnetic resonance imaging. The forefoot bones of each toe were totaled to assess overall forefoot bone length and then normalized to the maximum foot length.

RESULTS:

The relative total lengths of the forefoot bones in the big and second toes were significantly longer in 400-m sprinters than in non-sprinters (P < 0.05 for both). The relative total length of the forefoot bones of the second toe, but not of the big toe, in 400-m sprinters was significantly correlated with personal best 400-m sprint time (r = - 0.441, P = 0.028). These findings demonstrated that longer forefoot bones are related to higher long sprint performance in well-trained 400-m specialized sprinters. Therefore, the present study is the first to determine that morphological factors such as long forefoot bones may play an important role in achieving superior long sprinting performance.

KEYWORDS:

Anaerobic capacity; Ground reaction force; Magnetic resonance imaging; Plantar flexor moment; Sprint velocity

PMID:
30103812
PMCID:
PMC6090702
DOI:
10.1186/s13104-018-3685-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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