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Cell Mol Life Sci. 2018 Nov;75(21):3977-3990. doi: 10.1007/s00018-018-2901-1. Epub 2018 Aug 12.

Implication of gut microbiota metabolites in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

Author information

1
Sorbonne University, University Paris Descartes, INSERM UMR_S1138, Cordeliers Research Centre, 15 rue de l'Ecole de Médecine, 75006, Paris, France.
2
Section of Biomolecular Medicine, Division of Computational and Systems Medicine, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, Sir Alexander Fleming Building, London, UK.
3
McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, 740 Doctor Penfield Avenue, Montreal, QC, H3A 0G1, Canada.
4
Sorbonne University, University Paris Descartes, INSERM UMR_S1138, Cordeliers Research Centre, 15 rue de l'Ecole de Médecine, 75006, Paris, France. dominique.gauguier@inserm.fr.
5
Section of Biomolecular Medicine, Division of Computational and Systems Medicine, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, Sir Alexander Fleming Building, London, UK. dominique.gauguier@inserm.fr.
6
McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, 740 Doctor Penfield Avenue, Montreal, QC, H3A 0G1, Canada. dominique.gauguier@inserm.fr.

Abstract

Evidence from the literature keeps highlighting the impact of mutualistic bacterial communities of the gut microbiota on human health. The gut microbita is a complex ecosystem of symbiotic bacteria which contributes to mammalian host biology by processing, otherwise, indigestible nutrients, supplying essential metabolites, and contributing to modulate its immune system. Advances in sequencing technologies have enabled structural analysis of the human gut microbiota and allowed detection of changes in gut bacterial composition in several common diseases, including cardiometabolic disorders. Biological signals sent by the gut microbiota to the host, including microbial metabolites and pro-inflammatory molecules, mediate microbiome-host genome cross-talk. This rapidly expanding line of research can identify disease-causing and disease-predictive microbial metabolite biomarkers, which can be translated into novel biodiagnostic tests, dietary supplements, and nutritional interventions for personalized therapeutic developments in common diseases. Here, we review results from the most significant studies dealing with the association of products from the gut microbial metabolism with cardiometabolic disorders. We underline the importance of these postbiotic biomarkers in the diagnosis and treatment of human disorders.

KEYWORDS:

Animal models; Complex diseases; Gut microbiome; Metabolic modeling; Metabolic networks; Metabolomics; Microbiota; Symbiotic bacterial systems; Transgenomic interactions

PMID:
30101405
PMCID:
PMC6182343
DOI:
10.1007/s00018-018-2901-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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