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J Bodyw Mov Ther. 2018 Jul;22(3):832-837. doi: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.01.008. Epub 2018 Feb 17.

Effect of remote myofascial release on hamstring flexibility in asymptomatic individuals - A randomized clinical trial.

Author information

1
Department of Physiotherapy, School of Allied Health Sciences (SOAHS), Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal 576104, India.
2
Department of Physiotherapy, School of Allied Health Sciences (SOAHS), Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal 576104, India. Electronic address: anupama.prabhu@manipal.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The existence of continuity between fascia and muscles that may be anatomically distant from each other is emphasized in the tensegrity principle. Despite evidence from in vitro studies, there is a dearth of literature concerning the in vivo behavior of these connections.

AIM:

To compare the effect of Static Stretching (SS) of hamstrings with remote Myofascial Release (MFR) (bilateral plantar fascia and suboccipital region) and a combination of SS and remote MFR on hamstring flexibility. The secondary aim of this study was to investigate the difference between therapist administered and self-administered interventions.

DESIGN:

Three arm assessor-blinded Randomized Clinical Trial (RCT).

PARTICIPANTS:

Fifty-eight asymptomatic participants (16 Males; Mean age 22.69 ± 2.65 years).

METHOD:

Participants with tight hamstrings defined by a passive Knee Extension Angle (KEA) > 20° were included in the study and were assigned to one of the three groups. Group A (n = 19) was SS, group B (n = 20) was remote MFR, group C (n = 19) was a combination group who received both SS and remote MFR. Seven sessions of therapist administered intervention were delivered over a period of 10 days, which was followed by a 2-week self-administered home program. KEA and Sit and Reach Test (SRT) were used as outcomes and measurements were performed at baseline, end of the seventh session and after atwo-week follow-up.

RESULTS:

The results demonstrated that hamstring flexibility improved in all three groups after therapist administered interventions (p < 0.05), whereas, group C demonstrated additional benefits. None of the groups showed a statistically significant (p > 0.05) change in the KEA with self-intervention.

CONCLUSION:

The findings of this study indicated that all three interventions were effective in improving hamstring flexibility in young asymptomatic individuals when performed by the therapist.

KEYWORDS:

Fascia; Plantar fascia; Suboccipital; Superficial Back Line

PMID:
30100320
DOI:
10.1016/j.jbmt.2018.01.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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