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J Pharm Pract. 2018 Aug 13:897190018792797. doi: 10.1177/0897190018792797. [Epub ahead of print]

Significant Publications on Infectious Diseases Pharmacotherapy in 2017.

Author information

1
1 Department of Pharmacy Practice and Translational Research, University of Houston College of Pharmacy, Houston, TX, USA.
2
2 Department of Pharmacy, Memorial Hermann Greater Heights Hospital, Houston, TX, USA.
3
3 Division of Pharmacy, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA.
4
4 Department of Pharmacy, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX, USA.
5
5 Department of Pharmacy, CHI Baylor St Luke's Medical Center, Houston, TX, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The most significant peer-reviewed articles pertaining to infectious diseases (ID) pharmacotherapy, as selected by panels of ID pharmacists, are summarized.

SUMMARY:

Members of the Houston Infectious Diseases Network (HIDN) were asked to nominate peer-reviewed articles that they believed most contributed to the practice of ID pharmacotherapy in 2017, including the areas of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A list of 33 articles related to general ID pharmacotherapy and 4 articles related to HIV/AIDS was compiled. A survey was distributed to members of the Society of Infectious Diseases Pharmacists (SIDP) for the purpose of selecting 10 articles believed to have made the most significant impact on general ID pharmacotherapy and the single significant publication related to HIV/AIDS. Of 524 SIDP members who responded, 221 (42%) and 95 (18%) members voted for general pharmacotherapy- and HIV/AIDS-related articles, respectively. The highest ranked articles are summarized below.

CONCLUSION:

Remaining informed on the most significant ID-related publications is a challenge when considering the large number of ID-related articles published annually. This review of significant publications in 2017 may aid in that effort.

KEYWORDS:

anti-infectives; drug therapy; infectious diseases; pharmacotherapy; publications

PMID:
30099951
DOI:
10.1177/0897190018792797

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