Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Biomed Pharmacother. 2018 Nov;107:262-269. doi: 10.1016/j.biopha.2018.07.148. Epub 2018 Aug 8.

Oxytocin improves animal behaviors and ameliorates oxidative stress and inflammation in autistic mice.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110001, People's Republic of China. Electronic address: 88446486@163.com.
2
Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110001, People's Republic of China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder which significantly impacts the quality of people's life. Oxytocin is a hormone impacting the social cognition and interpersonal trust. In this study, we aimed to explore the role of oxytocin in autism.

METHODS:

Autistic mice models were established by valproate. Animal behaviors were assessed by open field test, tail suspension test, marble burying test and three-chamber social interaction test. Oxidative stress was evaluated by the levels or activities of malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, glutathion peroxidase, reduced glutathione and reactive oxygen species. Inflammation was assessed by the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-6. The number of activated microglia was detected by immunofluorescence with an Iba-1 antibody.

RESULTS:

Our results showed that oxytocin improved the behaviors of autistic mice, with less anxiety, depression and repetitive behavior, and ameliorated social interaction. Further study showed that the elevated oxidative stress and inflammation in autistic mice were alleviated after treatment of oxytocin.

CONCLUSION:

Our study demonstrates that oxytocin treatment ameliorates autism in a mouse model, maybe through its modulation on oxidative stress and inflammation. It is indicated that oxytocin may beneficial to autism.

KEYWORDS:

Autism; Inflammation; Microglia; Oxidative stress; Oxytocin

PMID:
30098544
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopha.2018.07.148
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center