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Eur J Sport Sci. 2019 Apr;19(3):287-294. doi: 10.1080/17461391.2018.1500643. Epub 2018 Aug 10.

Acute effects of aerobic exercise performed with different volumes on strength performance and neuromuscular parameters.

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1
a School of Physical Education and Sport , University of Sao Paulo , Sao Paulo , Brazil.

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to investigate the acute effect of the aerobic exercise volume on maximum strength and strength-endurance performance; and possible causes of strength decrements (i.e. central and peripheral fatigue). Twenty-one moderately trained men were submitted to a maximal incremental test to determine anaerobic threshold (AnT) and maximum dynamic strength (1RM) and strength-endurance (i.e. total volume load [TV]) tests to determine their baseline strength performance. Following, subjects performed six experimental sessions: aerobic exercise sessions (continuous running at 90% AnT) with different volumes (3 km, 5 km or 7 km) followed by 1RM or strength-endurance test in the 45° leg press exercise. Maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), voluntary activation (VA) level, contractile properties, and electromyographic activity (root mean square [RMS]) of the knee extensor muscles were assessed before and after aerobic exercises and after strength tests. TV was lower after 5 km and 7 km runs than in the control condition (12% and 22%, respectively). Additionally, TV was lower after 7 km than 3 km (14%) and 5 km (12%) runs. MVIC, VA, RMS, and contractile properties were reduced after all aerobic exercise volumes (∼8%, ∼5%, ∼11% and ∼6-14%, respectively). Additionally, MVIC, VA, and contractile properties were lower after strength tests (∼15%, ∼6%, ∼9-26%, respectively). In conclusion, strength-endurance performance is impaired when performed after aerobic exercise and the magnitude of this interference is dependent on the aerobic exercise volume; and peripheral and central fatigue indices could not explain the different TV observed.

KEYWORDS:

Fatigue; performance; resistance; strength; training

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