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Medicine (Baltimore). 2018 Aug;97(32):e11616. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000011616.

Borderline tuberculoid leprosy mimicking sarcoidosis: A case report.

Liu J1,2, Wen Y1,2, Xing Y1,2, Wang S3.

Author information

1
Beijing Tropical Medicine Research Institute, Beijing Friendship Hospital.
2
Beijing Key Laboratory for Research on Prevention and Treatment of Tropical Diseases (BZ0086), Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.
3
Pacific Institute of Medical Sciences, Bothell, Washington.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Leprosy is a chronic infectious granulomas disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae that can manifest as a wide variety of immunological and clinical features.

CASE SUMMARY:

Here, we describe the case of a woman with clinical characteristics of borderline tuberculoid (BT) leprosy that manifested as 3 asymmetric skin lesions involving her hip and lower limbs. This unusual presentation was initially misdiagnosed as sarcoidosis because noncaseating granulomas are a histopathological feature of both diseases. Differentiation and the diagnosis of BT leprosy was achieved using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify an M leprae specific DNA sequence and to detect serum antibodies specific to M leprae antigens. Accordingly, a 6-month course of multidrug therapy led to a marked improvement in the skin lesions.

CONCLUSION:

The use of auxiliary tests including real-time PCR to amplify an M leprae-specific DNA sequence, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and dipstick detection of serum antibodies specific to M leprae antigens are good methods to obtain a correct diagnosis of BT leprosy.

PMID:
30095620
PMCID:
PMC6133579
DOI:
10.1097/MD.0000000000011616
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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