Format

Send to

Choose Destination
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2018 Aug 10;67(31):845-849. doi: 10.15585/mmwr.mm6731a1.

Opioid Use Disorder Documented at Delivery Hospitalization - United States, 1999-2014.

Abstract

Opioid use by pregnant women represents a significant public health concern given the association of opioid exposure and adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes, including preterm labor, stillbirth, neonatal abstinence syndrome, and maternal mortality (1,2). State-level actions are critical to curbing the opioid epidemic through programs and policies to reduce use of prescription opioids and illegal opioids including heroin and illicitly manufactured fentanyl, both of which contribute to the epidemic (3). Hospital discharge data from the 1999-2014 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) were analyzed to describe U.S. national and state-specific trends in opioid use disorder documented at delivery hospitalization. Nationally, the prevalence of opioid use disorder more than quadrupled during 1999-2014 (from 1.5 per 1,000 delivery hospitalizations to 6.5; p<0.05). Increasing trends over time were observed in all 28 states with available data (p<0.05). In 2014, prevalence ranged from 0.7 in the District of Columbia (DC) to 48.6 in Vermont. Continued national, state, and provider efforts to prevent, monitor, and treat opioid use disorder among reproductive-aged and pregnant women are needed. Efforts might include improved access to data in Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs, increased substance abuse screening, use of medication-assisted therapy, and substance abuse treatment referrals.

PMID:
30091969
PMCID:
PMC6089335
DOI:
10.15585/mmwr.mm6731a1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for CDC - Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center