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Heredity (Edinb). 2018 Oct;121(4):361-373. doi: 10.1038/s41437-018-0130-x. Epub 2018 Aug 8.

Genotype-by-sex-by-diet interactions for nutritional preference, dietary consumption, and lipid deposition in a field cricket.

Author information

1
Centre for Ecology and Conservation, University of Exeter, Cornwall Campus, Penryn, Cornwall, TR10 9FE, UK.
2
Department of Bioscience, Terrestrial Ecology, Aarhus University, Vejlsøvej 25, 8600, Silkeborg, Denmark.
3
School of Science and Health, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW, 2751, Australia.
4
Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment, University of Western Sydney, Locked Bay 1797, Penrith, NSW, 2751, Australia.
5
Centre for Ecology and Conservation, University of Exeter, Cornwall Campus, Penryn, Cornwall, TR10 9FE, UK. J.Hunt@westernsydney.edu.au.
6
School of Science and Health, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW, 2751, Australia. J.Hunt@westernsydney.edu.au.
7
Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment, University of Western Sydney, Locked Bay 1797, Penrith, NSW, 2751, Australia. J.Hunt@westernsydney.edu.au.

Abstract

Changes in feeding behaviour, especially the overconsumption of calories, has led to a rise in the rates of obesity, diabetes, and other associated disorders in humans and a range of animals inhabiting human-influenced environments. However, understanding the relative contribution of genes, the nutritional environment, and their interaction to dietary intake and lipid deposition in the sexes still remains a major challenge. By combining nutritional geometry with quantitative genetics, we determined the effect of genes, the nutritional environment, and their interaction on the total nutritional preference (TP), total diet eaten (TE), and lipid mass (LM) of male and female black field crickets (Teleogryllus commodus) fed one of four diet pairs (DPs) differing in the ratio of protein to carbohydrate and total nutritional content. We found abundant additive genetic variance for TP, TE, and LM in both sexes and across all four DPs, with significant genetic correlations between TE and TP and between TP and LM in males. We also found significant genotype-by-DP and genotype-by-sex-by-DP interactions for each trait and significant genotype-by-sex interactions for TE and LM. Complex interactions between genes, sex, and the nutritional environment, therefore, play an important role in nutrient regulation and lipid deposition in T. commodus. This finding may also help explain the increasing rate of obesity and the maintenance of sex differences in obesity observed across many animal species, including humans.

PMID:
30089778
PMCID:
PMC6133965
[Available on 2019-10-01]
DOI:
10.1038/s41437-018-0130-x

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