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J Child Neurol. 2018 Oct;33(12):794-800. doi: 10.1177/0883073818789320. Epub 2018 Aug 8.

Objective Eye Tracking Deficits Following Concussion for Youth Seen in a Sports Medicine Setting.

Author information

1
1 Sports Medicine Center, Children's Hospital Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA.
2
2 Department of Orthopedics, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA.
3
3 The Micheli Center for Sports Injury Prevention, Waltham, MA, USA.
4
4 Department of Orthopaedics, Division of Sports Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
5
5 Sports Medicine and Performance Center, Division of Orthopedics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
6
6 Department of Pediatrics and Orthopaedic Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
7
7 University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Abstract

Quantification of visual deficits may help to identify dysfunction following concussion. We evaluated eye-tracking measurements among adolescents within 10 days of concussion and healthy control participants. Patients who reported to 2 tertiary care sport concussion clinics within 10 days of concussion completed an objective eye tracking assessment. Seventy-nine participants completed the study, 44 with concussion (mean age = 14.1 ± 2.2 years, 39% female) and 35 controls (mean age = 14.3 ± 2.4 years, 57% female). Right eye skew along the bottom of the screen was significantly higher for the concussion group compared to controls (median = 0.022 [interquartile range = -0.263, 0.482] vs 0.377 [interquartile range = -0.574, -0.031]; P = .002), but not the left eye. Among the variables investigated, right eye skew was altered for adolescents with a concussion. Visual function is an important component in the postconcussion evaluation, and identifying deficits soon after injury may allow for earlier specialist referral and intervention.

KEYWORDS:

adolescent; eye tracking; mild traumatic brain injury; pediatric; vision

PMID:
30088436
DOI:
10.1177/0883073818789320
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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