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Int J Mol Sci. 2018 Aug 7;19(8). pii: E2314. doi: 10.3390/ijms19082314.

Na⁺, K⁺-ATPase Signaling and Bipolar Disorder.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Neurobiology, Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada, The Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem 91120, Israel. davidli@ekmd.huji.ac.il.
2
Department of Medical Neurobiology, Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada, The Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem 91120, Israel. asheri@ekmd.huji.ac.il.
3
Department of Medical Neurobiology, Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada, The Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem 91120, Israel. haimr@ekmd.huji.ac.il.
4
Department of Medical Neurobiology, Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada, The Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem 91120, Israel. noa.rosenthal1@mail.huji.ac.il.
5
Department of Medical Neurobiology, Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada, The Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem 91120, Israel. vardanshiva@gmail.com.
6
Department of Medical Neurobiology, Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada, The Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem 91120, Israel. buzaglo@gmail.com.
7
Department of Medical Neurobiology, Institute for Medical Research Israel-Canada, The Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem 91120, Israel. anastasi.singalevich@mail.huji.ac.il.

Abstract

Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe and common chronic mental illness characterized by recurrent mood swings between depression and mania. The biological basis of the disease is poorly understood and its treatment is unsatisfactory. Although in past decades the "monoamine hypothesis" has dominated our understanding of both the pathophysiology of depressive disorders and the action of pharmacological treatments, recent studies focus on the involvement of additional neurotransmitters/neuromodulators systems and cellular processes in BD. Here, evidence for the participation of Na⁺, K⁺-ATPase and its endogenous regulators, the endogenous cardiac steroids (ECS), in the etiology of BD is reviewed. Proof for the involvement of brain Na⁺, K⁺-ATPase and ECS in behavior is summarized and it is hypothesized that ECS-Na⁺, K⁺-ATPase-induced activation of intracellular signaling participates in the mechanisms underlying BD. We propose that the activation of ERK, AKT, and NFκB, resulting from ECS-Na⁺, K⁺-ATPase interaction, modifies neuronal activity and neurotransmission which, in turn, participate in the regulation of behavior and BD. These observations suggest Na⁺, K⁺-ATPase-mediated signaling is a potential target for drug development for the treatment of BD.

KEYWORDS:

AKT; ERK; Na+, K+-ATPase; bipolar disorder; cardiac steroids; depression; mania; signaling

PMID:
30087257
PMCID:
PMC6121236
DOI:
10.3390/ijms19082314
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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