Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Public Health Nutr. 2018 Dec;21(17):3210-3215. doi: 10.1017/S1368980018001866. Epub 2018 Aug 8.

Like and share: associations between social media engagement and dietary choices in children.

Author information

1
1Prevention Research Collaboration,Sydney School of Public Health,University of Sydney,Sydney,NSW 2006,Australia.
2
4Early Start, School of Health & Society,University of Wollongong,Wollongong,NSW,Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine whether social media and online behaviours are associated with unhealthy food and beverage consumption in children.

DESIGN:

A cross-sectional online survey was used to assess Internet and social media use, including engagement with food and beverage brand content, and frequency of consumption of unhealthy foods and beverages. Linear regression models were used to examine associations between online behaviours, including engagement with food and beverage brand content, and consumption of unhealthy foods and beverages, adjusting for age, sex and socio-economic status.

SETTING:

New South Wales, Australia, in 2014.

SUBJECTS:

Children aged 10-16 years (n 417).

RESULTS:

Watching food brand video content on YouTube, purchasing food online and seeing favourite food brands advertised online were significantly associated with higher frequency of consumption of unhealthy foods and drinks after adjustment for age, sex and socio-economic status.

CONCLUSIONS:

Children who have higher online engagement with food brands and content, particularly through online video, are more likely to consume unhealthy foods and drinks. Our findings highlight the need to include social media in regulations and policies designed to limit children's exposure to unhealthy food marketing. Social media companies have a greater role to play in protecting children from advertising.

KEYWORDS:

Advertising; Digital; Energy-dense; Marketing; Unhealthy foods; nutrient-poor

PMID:
30086811
DOI:
10.1017/S1368980018001866
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Cambridge University Press
Loading ...
Support Center