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Brain Res. 2018 Nov 15;1699:100-106. doi: 10.1016/j.brainres.2018.08.007. Epub 2018 Aug 4.

Neuronal subset-specific deletion of Pten results in aberrant Wnt signaling and memory impairments.

Author information

1
Institute of Biomedical Studies, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798, USA.
2
Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107, USA.
3
The UCLA Brain Injury Research Center, Department of Neurosurgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.
4
Department of Psychology and Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA.
5
Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798, USA.
6
Institute of Biomedical Studies, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798, USA; Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798, USA; Department of Biology, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798, USA. Electronic address: joaquin_lugo@baylor.edu.

Abstract

The canonical Wnt and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathways both play critical roles in brain development early in life. There is extensive evidence of how each pathway is involved in neuronal and synaptic maturation, however, how these molecular networks interact requires further investigation. The present study examines the effect of neuronal subset-specific deletion of phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) in mice on Wnt signaling protein levels and associated cognitive impairments. PTEN functions as a negative regulator of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway, and mutations in Pten can result in cognitive and behavioral impairments. We found that deletion of Pten resulted in elevated Dvl2, Wnt5a/b, and Naked2, along with decreased GSK3β hippocampal synaptosome protein expression compared to wild type mice. Aberrations in the canonical Wnt pathway were associated with learning and memory deficits in Pten knockout mice, specifically in novel object recognition and the Lashley maze. This study demonstrates that deletion of Pten not only significantly impacts PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling, but affects proper functioning of the Wnt signaling pathway. Overall, these findings will help elucidate how the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway intersects with Wnt signaling to result in cognitive impairments, specifically in memory.

KEYWORDS:

Canonical; Learning; Memory; PI3K/Akt/mTOR; Pten; Wnt

PMID:
30086265
DOI:
10.1016/j.brainres.2018.08.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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