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Semin Pediatr Surg. 2018 Jun;27(3):200-206. doi: 10.1053/j.sempedsurg.2018.05.008. Epub 2018 May 27.

Chest wall reconstruction after tumor resection.

Author information

1
Pediatric Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1400 Pressler Street 17.6053, External Mail: Unit 1484, Houston, TX 77030, United States of America. Electronic address: gsandler@mdanderson.org.
2
Pediatric Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1400 Pressler Street 17.6053, External Mail: Unit 1484, Houston, TX 77030, United States of America. Electronic address: ahjordan90@gmail.com.

Abstract

Pediatric chest wall tumors are rare. Malignancies predominate of which sarcomas are the most common. Their resection and the subsequent reconstruction of the chest wall has been a surgical challenge since Dr. Frederick W. Parham published his first comprehensive account on the subject in 1898. Chest wall reconstruction is age, site and pathology dependent, must preserve long term function and cosmesis, must accommodate future growth and development, and must not be a hindrance to adjuvant radiotherapy. Bony reconstruction can be relatively simple or complex involving combinations of synthetic meshes, bioprosthetic materials, steel or titanium constructs, autografts, homografts and porcine or bovine xenografts. Soft tissue coverage can be achieved with direct closure, skin grafts, local advancement flaps, pedicled or free myocutaneous or osseomyocutaneous flaps or a combination of these. Complications to be avoided include scoliosis, pain and activity restriction, restrictive pulmonary deficits and interference with adjuvant radiotherapy which may result in tumor recurrence. Advances in cancer therapy have improved short- and long-term survival but significant functional and cosmetic challenges remain particularly for large chest wall defects in the very young. The future may lie with absorbable semi-rigid meshes, biointegratable acellular homografts and xenografts, demineralized bone matrices and bone marrow stromal cells, the patient's own lab-grown stem-cell based vascularized osseomyocutaneous chest wall grafts or the obsolescence of surgical resection altogether in the age of targeted anti-tumor and immune based therapy.

KEYWORDS:

Chest wall reconstruction; Chest wall tumor; Pediatric

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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