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Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2018 Oct;144:42-50. doi: 10.1016/j.diabres.2018.07.035. Epub 2018 Aug 2.

Perceptions and experiences of adult patients with type 1 diabetes using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy: Results of an online survey.

Author information

1
Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal, 110, avenue des Pins Ouest, Montreal, Quebec H2W 1R7, Canada; Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, 2900, Édouard-Montpetit, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4, Canada.
2
Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal, 110, avenue des Pins Ouest, Montreal, Quebec H2W 1R7, Canada.
3
Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal, 110, avenue des Pins Ouest, Montreal, Quebec H2W 1R7, Canada; Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, 3840, rues Saint-Urbain, Montreal, Quebec H2W 1T8, Canada.
4
Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, 3001-12(e) Avenue Nord, Sherbrooke, Québec J1H 5N4, Canada.
5
Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal, 110, avenue des Pins Ouest, Montreal, Quebec H2W 1R7, Canada; Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, 3840, rues Saint-Urbain, Montreal, Quebec H2W 1T8, Canada; Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, 2405, chemin de la Côte-Sainte-Catherine, Montréal, Québec H3T 1A8, Canada; Montreal Diabetes Research Center, 900 Saint-Denis, Montréal, Québec H2X 0A9, Canada. Electronic address: remi.rabasa-lhoret@ircm.qc.ca.

Abstract

AIMS:

To assess perceptions of patients using subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) about metabolic control, pump malfunctions, technical and insertion site adverse events (AEs) related to infusion sets/catheters as well as patients' practices.

METHODS:

Online survey (from June 2016 to January 2017) using an actualized 39-item questionnaire directed to adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D) using CSII therapy and living in the province of Quebec, Canada.

RESULTS:

Participants with T1D (n = 115, 72% females, 39.7 ± 14.0 years, diabetes duration: 20.9 ± 12.2 years, CSII use: 6.2 ± 4.1 years) adequately completed the survey. Infusion sets were changed every 3.3 ± 0.9 day. Improved glucose control and decreased number/severity of hypoglycemic episodes were reported by 80% and 68%/50% of subjects, respectively. Over the past year of CSII use, participants perceived no increase in anxiety/worry (84%), no negative impact on life (89%) or on time off from work/school (82%). Conversely, many experienced at least one clinical AEs at insertion site [pain (84%), adhesion (76%), irritation (69%), lipodystrophy (45%)] and technical issues [blockage (52%), cannula kinking (50%), pump stop (55%), air bubbles (46%)]. No significant association was observed between catheter wear-time and AEs. All participants had one or more problems related to CSII use, although only 37% reported addressing these issues with health professionals.

CONCLUSION:

Our study suggests that patients positively perceived CSII use although they experienced a high frequency of clinical and technical AEs. This warrants further attention by health professionals, investigators and manufacturers to optimize CSII therapy.

KEYWORDS:

Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion; Insulin catheters; Insulin infusion set; Insulin pumps; Survey; Type 1 diabetes

PMID:
30077691
DOI:
10.1016/j.diabres.2018.07.035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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