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Exp Mol Med. 2018 Aug 3;50(8):92. doi: 10.1038/s12276-018-0123-0.

Differentially expressed genes related to major depressive disorder and antidepressant response: genome-wide gene expression analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Changwon, Korea.
2
SAIHST, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.
3
Department of Neuropsychiatry, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea.
4
Department of Psychiatry, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. paulkim@skku.edu.
5
Department of Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. sy117.lee@samsung.com.
6
Department of Laboratory Medicine & Genetics, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. sy117.lee@samsung.com.

Abstract

Treatment response to antidepressants is limited and varies among patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). To discover genes and mechanisms related to the pathophysiology of MDD and antidepressant treatment response, we performed gene expression analyses using peripheral blood specimens from 38 MDD patients and 14 healthy individuals at baseline and at 6 weeks after the initiation of either selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or mirtazapine treatment. The results were compared with results from public microarray data. Seven differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between MDD patients and controls were identified in our study and in the public microarray data: CD58, CXCL8, EGF, TARP, TNFSF4, ZNF583, and ZNF587. CXCL8 was among the top 10 downregulated genes in both studies. Eight genes related to SSRI responsiveness, including BTNL8, showed alterations in gene expression in MDD. The expression of the FCRL6 gene differed between SSRI responders and nonresponders and changed after SSRI treatment compared to baseline. In evaluating the response to mirtazapine, 21 DEGs were identified when comparing MDD patients and controls and responders and nonresponders. These findings suggest that the pathophysiology of MDD and treatment response to antidepressants are associated with a number of processes, including DNA damage and apoptosis, that can be induced by immune activation and inflammation.

PMID:
30076325
PMCID:
PMC6076250
DOI:
10.1038/s12276-018-0123-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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