Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cell Biochem Biophys. 2018 Sep;76(3):345-356. doi: 10.1007/s12013-018-0852-7. Epub 2018 Aug 2.

Induced Mutation Proves a Potential Target for TB Therapy: A Molecular Dynamics Study on LprG.

Author information

1
Molecular Modelling and Drug Design Research Group, School of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville, Durban, 4001, South Africa.
2
School of Laboratory Medicine and Medical Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, 4001, South Africa.
3
Molecular Modelling and Drug Design Research Group, School of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville, Durban, 4001, South Africa. soliman@ukzn.ac.za.

Abstract

Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of wild-type and V91W mutant Mycobacterium tuberculosis-LprG (Mtb-LprG) were performed with the goal to provide a comprehensive understanding of the Mtb-LprG as a potential antimycobacterial target. A long-range MD simulations and post-MD analyzes led us to various results that plainly explained the impact of V91W mutation on Mtb-LprG. Herein, the results revealed that the wild-type is less stable compared to V91W mutant. This was further supported by root mean square fluctuation, where the V91W mutant showed a higher degree of flexibility compared to the wild-type. Dynamic cross-correlation analysis revealed that induced mutation leads to higher residual flexibility in the mutant structure as compared to the wild-type structure thus resulting in the existence of negatively correlated motions. The difference in principal component analysis scatter plot across the first two normal modes suggests a greater mobility of the V91W mutant conformation compared to the wild-type. Thermodynamic calculations revealed that the van der Waals (Evdw) forces contribute the most towards binding free energy in a case of the V91W mutant as compared to the wild-type LprG complex. In addition, the residue interaction networks revealed more of Evdw interaction existence among residues in case of the V91W mutant. This study supports the Mtb-LprG as a potential antimycobacterial target and also serves as a cornerstone to identifying new potential targets that have no inhibitors.

KEYWORDS:

Molecular dynamics; Mtb-LprG; Post-dynamics analysis; V91W mutant

PMID:
30073572
DOI:
10.1007/s12013-018-0852-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center