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J Orthop Sci. 2018 Nov;23(6):1056-1062. doi: 10.1016/j.jos.2018.07.004. Epub 2018 Jul 31.

Evaluation of the association between locomotive syndrome and metabolic syndrome.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tokai University Oiso Hospital, Gakkyou 21-1, Oiso, Naka-gun, Kanagawa, 259-0198, Japan. Electronic address: genya@syd.odn.ne.jp.
2
East Shonan Sports Medicine Services, Numama 1-1-21, Zushi, Kanagawa, 254-0046, Japan. Electronic address: nakamura@hiratsuka.saiseikai.or.jp.
3
Alcare Co.,Ltd., 19F, Arcacentral Bldg, 1-2-1 Kinshi, Sumida-ku, Tokyo, 130-0013, Japan. Electronic address: tmiura@alcare.co.jp.
4
Alcare Co.,Ltd., 19F, Arcacentral Bldg, 1-2-1 Kinshi, Sumida-ku, Tokyo, 130-0013, Japan. Electronic address: yharada@alcare.co.jp.
5
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Surgical Science, Tokai University School of Medicine, 143 Shimokasuya, Isehara, Kanagawa, 259-1193, Japan. Electronic address: sato-m@is.icc.u-tokai.ac.jp.
6
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Surgical Science, Tokai University School of Medicine, 143 Shimokasuya, Isehara, Kanagawa, 259-1193, Japan. Electronic address: masahiko@is.icc.u-tokai.ac.jp.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Locomotive syndrome (LS) includes disorders of the musculoskeletal system and is a high-risk condition that requires nursing care. We included an examination of locomotive function in specific health checkups to investigate the relationship between LS risk and the muscle strengths. The purpose of this study was to determine the distribution of LS and the relationship between LS and metabolic syndrome (MetS).

METHODS:

Among 2695 participants who undertook a specific health checkup, 790 received a locomotive examination (302 men and 488 women; mean age, 65.9 years). Data for MetS components were measured in the specific health checkup. Data about the locomotive examination were obtained from five tests: the two-step test, stand-up test, 25-question Geriatric Locomotive Function Scale, and measurement of lower limb muscular strength and grip strength.

RESULTS:

The MetS components did not differ according to LS risk level in men. In women, body weight, body mass index, and abdominal circumference were significantly lower in the non-LS group than in the LS risk level 1 or 2 groups. The ratio of lower limb muscular strength to body weight differed significantly between all risk groups in men and women. In women, lower limb muscular strength was significantly higher in those at risk of both LS and MetS (double-risk group) than in the LS-only group. In women, the ratio of lower limb muscular strength to body weight was significantly lower in the double-risk group than in the LS-only group.

CONCLUSIONS:

Adding a locomotive examination to the specific health checkup may be useful for identifying people at risk of LS or MetS. The prevalence rates of LS and MetS correlate positively in women. The ratio of lower limb muscular strength to body weight might be a better index of locomotor dysfunction than lower limb muscular strength alone.

PMID:
30072281
DOI:
10.1016/j.jos.2018.07.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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