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PLoS One. 2018 Aug 2;13(8):e0201555. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0201555. eCollection 2018.

A genome-wide association study of energy intake and expenditure.

Author information

1
Program in Genetic Epidemiology and Statistical Genetics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
2
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
3
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham & Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
4
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.

Abstract

Excessive energy intake or insufficient energy expenditure, which result in energy imbalance, contribute to the development of obesity. Obesity-related genes, such as FTO, are associated with energy traits. No genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been conducted to detect the genetic associations with energy-related traits, including energy intake and energy expenditure, among European-ancestry populations. In this study, we conducted a genome-wide study using pooled GWAS including 12,030 European-ancestry women and 6,743 European-ancestry men to identify genetic variants associated with these two energy traits. We observed a statistically significant genome-wide SNP heritability for energy intake of 6.05% (95%CI = (1.76, 10.34), P = 0.006); the SNP heritability for expenditure was not statistically significantly greater than zero. We discovered three SNPs on chromosome 12q13 near gene ANKRD33 that were genome-wide significantly associated with increased total energy intake among all men. We also identified signals on region 2q22 that were associated with energy expenditure among lean people. Body mass index related SNPs were found to be significantly associated with energy intake and expenditure through SNP set analyses. Larger GWAS studies of total energy traits are warranted to explore the genetic basis of energy intake, including possible differences between men and women, and the association between total energy intake and other downstream phenotypes, such as diabetes and chronic diseases.

PMID:
30071075
PMCID:
PMC6072034
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0201555
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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