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Surg Case Rep. 2018 Aug 1;4(1):85. doi: 10.1186/s40792-018-0493-5.

Successful wound treatment using negative pressure wound therapy without primary closure in a patient undergoing highly contaminated abdominal surgery.

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Kita-ku, Okayama, 700-8558, Japan. ta73yoshioka@gmail.com.
2
Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Kita-ku, Okayama, 700-8558, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The indications for negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) continue to expand, and NPWT has become a powerful tool for the treatment of interactive wounds. Recently, the use of NPWT over closed incisions has been shown to prevent surgical site infection (SSI) in patients undergoing contaminated or acute care surgery as prophylactic NPWT. In this article, we present our successful experience using NPWT without primary skin closure for wound treatment after a highly contaminated enterological surgery. The procedure we present in this case report is considerably different from the conventional prophylactic NPWT and a novel method in the field of gastrointestinal surgery.

CASE PRESENTATION:

A 33-year-old man with Crohn's disease underwent a dirty, infected enterological surgical procedure for the treatment of abdominal wall abscess and multiple fistulas around his colonic stoma. The stoma reconstruction and wound debridement resulted in a broad skin defect, and the incision was strategically left open. In addition to the infected wound condition (class IV), Crohn's disease itself is a risk factor for SSI; consequently, we induced NPWT immediately after the surgery and closed the incision from both ends in a stepwise manner using sutures each time we changed the dressing. This procedure was effective, enabling complete healing and closure at the surgical site on postoperative day 14 without infection or a skin defect.

CONCLUSION:

For highly contaminated enterological surgery, purposely leaving the incision open and starting NPWT immediately after the procedure is an effective strategy for early wound closure and the prevention of SSI.

KEYWORDS:

Contaminated surgery; Crohn’s disease; JANIS; NPWT; Prophylactic NPWT; SSI

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