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Biochem J. 1986 Jan 15;233(2):435-41.

Inhibition of the apparent affinity of the epidermal growth factor receptor caused by phorbol diesters correlates with phosphorylation of threonine-654 but not other sites on the receptor.

Abstract

Addition of 4 beta-phorbol 12 beta-myristate 13 alpha-acetate (PMA) to A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells causes a marked increase in the phosphorylation state of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor with a concomitant inhibition of both the high-affinity binding of 125I-EGF and the receptor tyrosine kinase activity. It was found in the present studies that the diuretic drug amiloride has no effect on the action of PMA to inhibit the binding of 125I-EGF. However, amiloride was observed to inhibit markedly the effect of PMA to cause a 3-fold increase in the phosphorylation state of the EGF receptors. In the presence of PMA and amiloride, the increase in the phosphorylation state of the EGF receptors was found to be only 1.2-fold over controls. Analysis of the EGF receptor phosphorylation sites by phosphopeptide mapping by reverse-phase h.p.l.c. demonstrated that PMA increases the phosphorylation state of the EGF receptor at many sites. One of these sites has been identified as a C-kinase substrate, threonine-654. In the presence of amiloride, PMA causes phosphorylation of threonine-654 to the same stoichiometry as that observed in the absence of amiloride. However, the marked increase in the phosphorylation state of the EGF receptor at other sites caused by PMA is abolished in the presence of amiloride. We conclude that the extensive phosphorylation of the EGF receptor at several sites caused by the addition of PMA to A431 cells is not required for the action of PMA to inhibit the high-affinity binding of 125I-EGF. The results indicate that the phosphorylation state of threonine-654 may play a role in this process.

PMID:
3006669
PMCID:
PMC1153044
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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