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J Behav Med. 2019 Apr;42(2):246-255. doi: 10.1007/s10865-018-9958-z. Epub 2018 Jul 31.

Effects of addictive-like eating behaviors on weight loss with behavioral obesity treatment.

Author information

1
Department of Biobehavioral Health Sciences, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, 418 Curie Blvd, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, USA. arichao@nursing.upenn.edu.
2
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA. arichao@nursing.upenn.edu.
3
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
5
Obesity, Metabolism, and Endocrine Center, King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
6
Department of Psychiatry, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Abstract

To examine the relationship between food cravings and food addiction as defined by the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) and to assess the effects of these variables on weight loss during a 14-week group lifestyle modification program. Data were from 178 participants who were prescribed a 1000-1200 kcal/day portion-controlled diet and provided with weekly group lifestyle modification sessions. Participants completed the Food Craving Inventory and YFAS pre- and post-treatment. Weight was measured weekly. Participants with YFAS-defined food addiction (6.7%) reported more frequent overall food cravings relative to those without food addiction. More frequent food cravings at baseline were associated with less weight loss over the 14 weeks. Analyzed categorically, participants in the highest tertile of baseline food cravings lost 7.6 ± 0.5% of initial weight, which was significantly less compared to those in the lowest tertile who lost 9.1 ± 0.5%. Percent weight loss did not differ significantly between participants with YFAS-defined food addiction (6.5 ± 1.2%) and those who did not meet criteria (8.6 ± 0.3%). Addictive-like eating behaviors significantly declined from pre- to post-treatment. Participants with frequent food cravings lost less weight than their peers. Targeted interventions for food cravings could improve weight loss in these individuals. Few participants met YFAS-defined criteria for food addiction. Addictive-like eating behaviors tended to decline during behavioral weight loss, but neither baseline nor change in YFAS scores predicted weight loss.

KEYWORDS:

Cravings; Food addiction; Obesity; Treatment; Weight loss

PMID:
30066187
PMCID:
PMC6711180
[Available on 2020-04-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s10865-018-9958-z

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