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Am J Cardiol. 2018 Sep 15;122(6):1021-1027. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2018.05.037. Epub 2018 Jun 21.

Readmission Patterns During Long-Term Follow-Up After Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation.

Author information

1
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York. Electronic address: Himabindu_Vidula@URMC.Rochester.edu.
2
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York.
3
Department of Biostatistics, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York.

Abstract

As more patients are supported for longer periods by a left ventricular assist device (LVAD), hospital readmission is becoming a growing problem. However, data about temporal changes in readmission rates and causes for patients with prolonged LVAD support are limited. We aimed to evaluate rates, causes, and predictors of any and long-term readmission after LVAD placement at our institution. We followed 177 HeartMate II LVAD patients for a mean of 1.90 ± 1.33 years post initial discharge after implantation. A marginal rate model was used to evaluate readmission rates, accounting for mortality. During the first year, the readmission rate was 1.79 (95% confidence interval 1.51 to 2.10) readmissions per year. The readmission rate was 1.54 (95% confidence interval 1.07 to 1.93) 2 to 3 years after initial discharge. There was a further decrease in readmission rate in the 3- to 4-year interval. The most common causes of readmission during the first year and even after 3 to 4 years of LVAD support were bleeding (excluding intracranial bleeding) and infection. Female gender was associated with an increased risk of readmission in multivariable analyses, while blood urea nitrogen was predictive of long-term readmissions. In conclusion, readmission after LVAD implantation is common, but readmission rates decrease during long-term follow-up. Bleeding and infection remain leading causes of readmission during longer follow-up and strategies to decrease these complications may reduce readmission rates. Female patients and patients with renal dysfunction have increased risk of readmission and further studies are needed to improve outcomes in these groups.

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