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Theor Appl Genet. 2018 Oct;131(10):2179-2196. doi: 10.1007/s00122-018-3146-y. Epub 2018 Jul 30.

Mapping of novel salt tolerance QTL in an Excalibur × Kukri doubled haploid wheat population.

Author information

1
Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics, PMB 1, Glen Osmond, SA, 5064, Australia.
2
School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, The University of Adelaide, PMB 1, Glen Osmond, SA, 5064, Australia.
3
Plant Industries Development, Department of Primary Industry and Resources, PO Box 3000, Darwin, NT, 0801, Australia.
4
The Plant Accelerator, Australian Plant Phenomics Facility, The University of Adelaide, Urrbrae, SA, 5064, Australia.
5
Phenomics and Bioinformatics Research Center, The University of South Australia, GPO Box 2471, Mawson Lakes, 5001, SA, Australia.
6
Bethlehem University, Rue de Freres #9, Bethlehem, West Bank, Palestine.
7
School of Agriculture and Environment (M084), The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA, 6009, Australia.
8
Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development, 3 Baron-Hay Court, South Perth, 6151, WA, Australia.
9
ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology, The University of Adelaide, PMB 1, Glen Osmond, SA, 5064, Australia.
10
Division of Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia.
11
Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics, PMB 1, Glen Osmond, SA, 5064, Australia. stuart.roy@adelaide.edu.au.
12
School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, The University of Adelaide, PMB 1, Glen Osmond, SA, 5064, Australia. stuart.roy@adelaide.edu.au.

Abstract

Novel QTL for salinity tolerance traits have been detected using non-destructive and destructive phenotyping in bread wheat and were shown to be linked to improvements in yield in saline fields. Soil salinity is a major limitation to cereal production. Breeding new salt-tolerant cultivars has the potential to improve cereal crop yields. In this study, a doubled haploid bread wheat mapping population, derived from the bi-parental cross of Excalibur × Kukri, was grown in a glasshouse under control and salinity treatments and evaluated using high-throughput non-destructive imaging technology. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of this population detected multiple QTL under salt and control treatments. Of these, six QTL were detected in the salt treatment including one for maintenance of shoot growth under salinity (QG(1-5).asl-7A), one for leaf Na+ exclusion (QNa.asl-7A) and four for leaf K+ accumulation (QK.asl-2B.1, QK.asl-2B.2, QK.asl-5A and QK:Na.asl-6A). The beneficial allele for QG(1-5).asl-7A (the maintenance of shoot growth under salinity) was present in six out of 44 mainly Australian bread and durum wheat cultivars. The effect of each QTL allele on grain yield was tested in a range of salinity concentrations at three field sites across 2 years. In six out of nine field trials with different levels of salinity stress, lines with alleles for Na+ exclusion and/or K+ maintenance at three QTL (QNa.asl-7A, QK.asl-2B.2 and QK:Na.asl-6A) excluded more Na+ or accumulated more K+ compared to lines without these alleles. Importantly, the QK.asl-2B.2 allele for higher K+ accumulation was found to be associated with higher grain yield at all field sites. Several alleles at other QTL were associated with higher grain yields at selected field sites.

PMID:
30062653
PMCID:
PMC6154029
DOI:
10.1007/s00122-018-3146-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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