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BMJ Open. 2018 Jul 30;8(7):e020182. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-020182.

Effect of multiple risk behaviours in adolescence on educational attainment at age 16 years: a UK birth cohort study.

Author information

1
Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To explore the association between adolescent multiple risk behaviours (MRBs) and educational attainment.

DESIGN:

Prospective population-based UK birth cohort study.

SETTING:

Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), a UK birth cohort of children born in 1991-1992.

PARTICIPANTS:

Data on some or all MRB measures were available for 5401 ALSPAC participants who attended a clinic at age 15 years and/or completed a detailed questionnaire at age 16 years. Multiple imputation was used to account for missing data.

PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES:

Capped General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) score and odds of attaining five or more GCSE examinations at grades A*-C. Both outcome measures come from the National Pupil Database and were linked to the ALSPAC data.

RESULTS:

Engagement in MRB was strongly associated with poorer educational attainment. Each additional risk equated to -6.31 (95% CI -7.03 to -5.58, p<0.001) in capped GCSE score, equivalent to a one grade reduction or reduced odds of attaining five or more A*-C grades of 23% (OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.74 to 0.81, p<0.001). The average cohort member engaged in 3.24 MRB and therefore have an associated reduction in GCSE score equivalent to three and a half grades in one examination, or reduced odds of attaining five or more A*-C grades of 75%.

CONCLUSION:

Engagement in adolescent MRB is strongly associated with poorer educational attainment at 16 years. Preventing MRB could improve educational attainment and thereby directly and indirectly improve longer-term health.

KEYWORDS:

ALSPAC; UK birth cohort study; adolescence; educational attainment; multiple risk behaviours

PMID:
30061432
PMCID:
PMC6067358
DOI:
10.1136/bmjopen-2017-020182
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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