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Jpn J Clin Oncol. 2018 Sep 1;48(9):799-805. doi: 10.1093/jjco/hyy105.

The influence of anatomic location on outcomes in patients with localized primary soft tissue sarcoma.

Zhao R1,2, Yu X3,4, Feng Y3,4, Wang J5,6, Mao Y2, Yin W2, Zhang Z3,4, Guo X3,4, Ma S1.

Author information

1
Department of Radiation Oncology, The Affiliated Hangzhou Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Hangzhou First People's Hospital, Hangzhou, Zhejiang.
2
Department of Radiation Oncology, Hangzhou Cancer Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang.
3
Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Fudan University, Xuhui, Shanghai.
4
Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, Xuhui, Shanghai.
5
Department of Pathology, Cancer Hospital of Fudan University, Xuhui, Shanghai.
6
Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, Xuhui, Shanghai, China.

Abstract

Background:

We hypothesized that survival varied significantly between retroperitoneal soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and extremity/trunk STS. This study explored the reasons for the different outcomes and identified patient characteristics for survival.

Methods:

This retrospective study identified 213 consecutive patients with localized primary STS from January 2002 to July 2013, including 47 retroperitoneal STS (22.1%) and 166 extremity/trunk STS (77.9%). Local failure-free survival (LFFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) and overall survival (OS) were constructed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate Cox proportional hazards regression models were fit to assess the ability of patient characteristics to predict survival.

Results:

At presentation, patients with retroperitoneal STS had larger tumor size (median size 18 cm vs. 6 cm; P < 0.001) and positive margin (21.3% vs. 8.4%; P = 0.014), and less often received radiotherapy (2.1% vs. 45.8%; P < 0.001). The median follow-up time for the entire population was 68 months (range, 5-127 months). Local recurrence was more frequent in patients with retroperitoneal STS compared with patients with extremity/trunk STS (53.2% vs. 28.3%; P = 0.001). LFFS and OS were lower in patients with retroperitoneal STS than extremity/trunk STS, with 5-year LFFS (50% vs. 74.3%; P < 0.001) and 5-year OS (65.4% vs. 77.5%; P = 0.017), respectively.

Conclusion:

Retroperitoneal STS was associated with significantly worse survival compared with extremity/trunk STS. Larger tumor size, more patients with positive margin and fewer patients received radiotherapy in retroperitoneal group may result in worse survival compared with extremity/trunk disease.

PMID:
30060202
DOI:
10.1093/jjco/hyy105
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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