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Ophthalmic Plast Reconstr Surg. 2018 Jul 24. doi: 10.1097/IOP.0000000000001174. [Epub ahead of print]

Ophthalmic Plastic Surgery in Patients 100 Years and Older.

Author information

1
David G. Cogan Laboratory of Ophthalmic Pathology, Department of Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School.
2
Department of Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
3
Concord Eye Center, Concord, New Hampshire.
4
Eye Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons of Central New York, Syracuse, New York.
5
Sutula Eye Associates, Milford , Massachusetts.
6
Eye Health Services, East Weymouth, Massachusetts.
7
Ophthalmic Consultants of Boston, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The centenarian population is growing and ophthalmic plastic surgeons are providing care to an increasing number of elderly patients. Outcomes of centenarians have not been previously studied in the ophthalmic plastic surgery literature. The goal of the current review was to examine the baseline characteristics, surgical problems, and outcomes of this select group of patients.

METHODS:

A retrospective chart review was performed. Patients who underwent ophthalmic plastic surgery at age 100 or older between January 2000 and June 2016 by a member of the New England Oculoplastics Society were included in the study.

RESULTS:

Fifteen patients met inclusion criteria. The majority (66%) were female. More than half (60%) presented with a surgical problem of an urgent nature. Most disorders involved the lacrimal system or eyelids, and many were the result of trauma or infection. There were no cases of orbital tumor or thyroid eye disease. There were no surgical or anesthesia-related complications. Most patients (80%) had no documented history of dementia, and only 1 was diabetic. Notably, 33% of patients presented with no light perception vision in at least 1 eye.

CONCLUSIONS:

Ophthalmic plastic surgery can be performed safely in select patients 100 years of age and older. Formal prospective studies are needed to improve surgical care in this group.

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